Classification & Compensation

Overtime Compensation

Positions at UO are determined to be eligible or ineligible for overtime compensation based on federal law (Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, or "FLSA").  Non-exempt employees are eligible for overtime compensation of 1.5 times the regular rate for all hours over 40 in the workweek.  Exempt employees are not eligible for overtime compensation.  The majority of classified positions and some unclassified positions at UO are eligible for overtime compensation.  Temporary and student employees are non-exempt and are eligible for overtime compensation. 

Positions covered by the OUS-SEIU/OPEU Collective Bargaining Agreement have additional provisions for payment of overtime to eligible classified staff.  Non-exempt employees are eligible for 1.5 times the regular rate for all hours over 8 hours in one day or over 40 in the workweek.  Some classified employees work a flexible workweek and have signed a flexible work agreement.  These employees are eligible for overtime compensation for hours over 40 in one week.  Exempt classified employees earn exchange time (compensatory time) for all hours worked over 40 in a week at the straight time rate.

UO employees having questions about overtime eligibility or payments may wish to reference the following

For further information, please contact the Employment Manager at 346-2963 or HR Analyst at 346-6296.

Bureau of Labor and Industries (BOLI)

Teamsters Hours of Work and Overtime

Teamsters hours of work and overtime information can be found in the Collective Bargaining Agreement on page 14; Article 12, Sections 3-9.

Differential Pay

Article 20 of the SEIU CBA outlines differential pay. Please Diana Sobczynski, Senior Compensation Analyst, with questions.

Differential Pay Forms

There following forms are available for assigning and approving differential pay.

Lead Work Differential

Article 20, Section 5 of the SEIU CBA outlines the requirements for lead work pay differential. The following is the process for assigning lead work:

  1. Fill out the Lead Work Differential Request Form.
  2. Attach a copy of the memo given to the employee informing them of their Lead Work assignment.
  3. Ensure that the signature portion of the paperwork is complete.
  4. Send the paperwork to the Office of Human Resources, attention Sr. Compensation Analyst.
  5. After the paperwork is received in HR it will be reviewed. If there are no questions concerning the request, the approval will be emailed to you and you will be directed to work with your payroll administrator to implement pay.

Work Out of Classification (WOC)

Article 20 – Differential Pay, Section 6 of the SEIU CBA outlines the requirements for Work Out-of-Classification. The following is the process for initiating the work-out-of-class differential:

  1. Review and fill out the Work-Out-Of-Class Form;
  2. Ensure the paperwork is complete, including signatures;
  3. Attach a copy of the justification given to the employee informing them of their out-of-class duties;
  4. Send the paperwork to the Office of Human Resources or scan and email, attention Sr. Compensation Analyst;
  5. After the paperwork is received in HR it will be reviewed. If there are no questions, an approval email notification will be sent to the contact person indicated on the paperwork with instructions to work with your department payroll administrator to initiate differential pay.

 

Differential Pay Forms

There following forms are available for assigning and approving differential pay.

Lead Work Differential

Article 20, Section 5 of the SEIU CBA outlines the requirements for lead work pay differential. The following is the process for assigning lead work:

  1. Fill out the Lead Work Differential Request Form.
  2. Attach a copy of the memo given to the employee informing them of their Lead Work assignment.
  3. Ensure that the signature portion of the paperwork is complete.
  4. Send the paperwork to the Office of Human Resources, attention Sr. Compensation Analyst.
  5. After the paperwork is received in HR it will be reviewed. If there are no questions concerning the request, the approval will be emailed to you and you will be directed to work with your payroll administrator to implement pay.

Please contact the Sr. Compensation Analyst with further questions.

Lead Work Differential Form.pdf

File attachments: 
Description: 

University of Oregon - Human Resources
677 East 12th Ave., Ste. 400
5210 University of Oregon · Eugene, OR 97403-5210
Office (541) 346-3159 · Fax (541) 346-2548
Lead Work Differential - SEIU Classified Staff
INSTRUCTIONS:
1. Fill out the Lead Work Differential Request Form.
2. Attach a copy of the memo given to the employee informing them of their Lead Work assignment.
3. Ensure that the signature portion of the paperwork is complete.
4. Send the paperwork to the Office of Human Resources, attention Sr. Compensation Analyst.
5. After the paperwork is received in HR it will be reviewed. If there are no questions concerning the request, the approval will be emailed to you and you will be directed to work with your payroll administrator to implement pay.
Please contact the Sr. Compensation Analyst with further questions.
1. Date
2. Department
3. Employee Name
4. Supervisor
5. Employee 95 #
6. Employee Position #
7. Duration of lead work
 Open-ended
 Fixed*
8. Start Date
9. End Date
12. Per SEIU, Local 503 OPEU Bargaining Unit Agreement Article 20, Section 5, when a classified employee is formally assigned, in writing, to perform lead work duties over two (2) or more bargaining unit employees in an equivalent or lower salary range for ten (10) consecutive work days or longer, the employee shall be paid a lead work differential. Lead work differential shall not apply to employees in those classifications which normally perform oversight or lead work duties. List classified employees over which lead work will be assigned [list additional on reverse or separate piece of paper]:
Name Classification Title Position #
1.
2.
3.
4.
NOTE: PLEASE ATTACH COPY OF MEMO TO EMPLOYEE WHICH ASSIGNS LEAD WORK
Supervisor Name (PRINT)
Supervisor Signature
Supervisor Phone & Email
Date
HR OFFICE USE ONLY
16. LEAD Differential Amount $:
____________________________________________________________________________________________
Human Resources Rep. Printed Name and Signature Date Phone Number

Work Out of Classification (WOC) - Classified Staff

Article 20 – Differential Pay, Section 6 of the SEIU CBA outlines the requirements for Work Out-of-Classification. The following is the process for initiating the work-out-of-class differential:

  1. Review and fill out the work-out-of-class form;
  2. Ensure the paperwork is complete, including signatures;
  3. Attach a copy of the justification given to the employee informing them of their out-of-class duties;
  4. Send the paperwork to the Office of Human Resources or scan and email, attention Sr. Compensation Analyst;
  5. After the paperwork is received in HR it will be reviewed. If there are no questions, an approval email notification will be sent to the contact person indicated on the paperwork with instructions to work with your department payroll administrator to initiate differential pay.

Please contact the Sr. Compensation Analyst with further questions.

Work Out of Class Form.pdf

File attachments: 
Description: 

University of Oregon - Human Resources
677 East 12th Ave., Ste. 400
5210 University of Oregon · Eugene, OR 97403-5210
Office (541) 346-3159 · Fax (541) 346-2548
Work Out of Class Differential - SEIU Classified Staff
Article 20 – Differential Pay, Section 6 of the SEIU CBA outlines the requirements for Work Out-of-Classification.
INSTRUCTIONS:
1. Fill out the Work Out of Class Form.
2. Ensure the paperwork is complete, including signatures.
3. Attach a copy of the justification given to the employee informing them of their out-of-class duties.
4. Send the paperwork to the Office of Human Resources or scan and email, attention Sr. Compensation Analyst
5. After the paperwork is received in HR it will be reviewed. If there are no questions, an approval email notification will be sent to the contact person indicated on the paperwork with instructions with work with your department payroll administrator to initiate differential pay.
Please contact the Sr. Compensation Analyst with further questions.
1. Date
2. Department
3. Employee Name
4. Supervisor
5. Employee 95 #
6. Employee Position #
7. Current Classification Title
8. Proposed Higher Classification Title
9. Current Salary Range
10. Current Step
11. Current Pay $
12. Start Date
13. End Date
12. Please provide the following information. You may also attach a memo.
• List all duties of the higher classification being performed. Include the percentage/hours completing these duties.
• Include the reason for the request.
Supervisor Signature
Date
Supervisor Phone
Supervisor email
HR OFFICE USE ONLY
12. WOC Classification Title
13. WOC SR
14. WOC STEP & PAY
15. WOC Type *
 5% (IT Position)
 1st Step of
Higher Class
 Other
16. WOC Differential Amount
$
____________________________________________________________________________________________
Human Resources Rep. Printed Name and Signature Date Phone Number

UO/SEIU-OPEU Monthly Salary Schedule

Salary Schedule: Effective December 1, 2016

Classifications currently in use at the University of Oregon. For a complete list of classifications, see OUS Classification Specifications.

Printable option: View a printable version.

Class Number Class Title Salary Range Step 1 Step 2 Step 3 Step 4 Step 5 Step 6 Step 7 Step 8 Step 9 Step 10
1202 Accountant 1 23 3300 3458 3623 3796 3975 4175 4372 4581 4800 5037
19.04 19.95 20.90 21.90 22.93 24.09 25.22 26.43 27.69 29.06
1203 Accountant 2 25 3623 3796 3975 4175 4372 4581 4800 5037 5285 5546
20.90 21.90 22.93 24.09 25.22 26.43 27.69 29.06 30.49 32.00
201 Accounting Technician 15 2383 2476 2555 2664 2769 2892 3016 3152 3300 3458
13.75 14.28 14.74 15.37 15.98 16.68 17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95
107 Administrative Program Assistant 17 2555 2664 2769 2892 3016 3152 3300 3458 3623 3796
14.74 15.37 15.98 16.68 17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95 20.90 21.90
108 Administrative Program Specialist 19 2769 2892 3016 3152 3300 3458 3623 3796 3975 4175
15.98 16.68 17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95 20.90 21.90 22.93 24.09
3615 Architectural Consultant 27 3975 4175 4372 4581 4800 5037 5285 5546 5810 6096
22.93 24.09 25.22 26.43 27.69 29.06 30.49 32.00 33.52 35.17
3151 Architectural Drafter 2 18 2664 2769 2892 3016 3152 3300 3458 3623 3796 3975
15.37 15.98 16.68 17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95 20.90 21.90 22.93
2205 Archivist 21 3016 3152 3300 3458 3623 3796 3975 4175 4372 4581
17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95 20.90 21.90 22.93 24.09 25.22 26.43
715 Athletic Equipment Coordinator 15B         2769 2892 3016 3152 3300 3458
        15.98 16.68 17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95
2190 Audio Visual Assistant 10   2079 2147 2218 2297 2383 2476 2555 2664 2769
  11.99 12.39 12.80 13.25 13.75 14.28 14.74 15.37 15.98
2195 Audio Visual Repair Tech 18B         3152 3300 3458 3623 3796 3975
        18.18 19.04 19.95 20.90 21.90 22.93
2191 Audio Visual Tech 1 12 2147 2218 2297 2383 2476 2555 2664 2769 2892 3016
12.39 12.80 13.25 13.75 14.28 14.74 15.37 15.98 16.68 17.40
2192 Audio Visual Tech 2 15 2383 2476 2555 2664 2769 2892 3016 3152 3300 3458
13.75 14.28 14.74 15.37 15.98 16.68 17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95
4410 Auto Mechanic 1 12B         2476 2555 2664 2769 2892 3016
        14.28 14.74 15.37 15.98 16.68 17.40
9110 Baker 16 2476 2555 2664 2769 2892 3016 3152 3300 3458 3623
14.28 14.74 15.37 15.98 16.68 17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95 20.90
4515 Boat Operator 17B         3016 3152 3300 3458 3623 3796
        17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95 20.90 21.90
2162 Broadcast/Tele Engineer 1 21 3016 3152 3300 3458 3623 3796 3975 4175 4372 4581
17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95 20.90 21.90 22.93 24.09 25.22 26.43
2163 Broadcast/Tele Engineer 2 23 3300 3458 3623 3796 3975 4175 4372 4581 4800 5037
19.04 19.95 20.90 21.90 22.93 24.09 25.22 26.43 27.69 29.06
792 Buyer 1 18 2664 2769 2892 3016 3152 3300 3458 3623 3796 3975
15.37 15.98 16.68 17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95 20.90 21.90 22.93
793 Buyer 2 20 2892 3016 3152 3300 3458 3623 3796 3975 4175 4372
16.68 17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95 20.90 21.90 22.93 24.09 25.22
794 Buyer 3 23 3300 3458 3623 3796 3975 4175 4372 4581 4800 5037
19.04 19.95 20.90 21.90 22.93 24.09 25.22 26.43 27.69 29.06
312 Campus Dispatcher 15 2383 2476 2555 2664 2769 2892 3016 3152 3300 3458
13.75 14.28 14.74 15.37 15.98 16.68 17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95
5520 Campus Patrol Officer 12 2147 2218 2297 2383 2476 2555 2664 2769 2892 3016
12.39 12.80 13.25 13.75 14.28 14.74 15.37 15.98 16.68 17.40
5522 Campus Security/ Public Safety Officer 17 2555 2664 2769 2892 3016 3152 3300 3458 3623 3796
14.74 15.37 15.98 16.68 17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95 20.90 21.90
4207 Carpenter 19B         3300 3458 3623 3796 3975 4175
        19.04 19.95 20.90 21.90 22.93 24.09
3121 Cartographer Program Specialist 22 3152 3300 3458 3623 3796 3975 4175 4372 4581 4800
18.18 19.04 19.95 20.90 21.90 22.93 24.09 25.22 26.43 27.69
230 Cashier 1 10   2079 2147 2218 2297 2383 2476 2555 2664 2769
  11.99 12.39 12.80 13.25 13.75 14.28 14.74 15.37 15.98
4251 Co-Generation Engineer 25 3623 3796 3975 4175 4372 4581 4800 5037 5285 5546
20.90 21.90 22.93 24.09 25.22 26.43 27.69 29.06 30.49 32.00
5310 Construction Inspector 22B         3796 3975 4175 4372 4581 4800
        21.90 22.93 24.09 25.22 26.43 27.69
4270 Construction Project Manager 1 23 3300 3458 3623 3796 3975 4175 4372 4581 4800 5037
19.04 19.95 20.90 21.90 22.93 24.09 25.22 26.43 27.69 29.06
4271 Construction Project Manager 2 26 3796 3975 4175 4372 4581 4800 5037 5285 5546 5810
21.90 22.93 24.09 25.22 26.43 27.69 29.06 30.49 32.00 33.52
9116 Cook 1 12 2147 2218 2297 2383 2476 2555 2664 2769 2892 3016
12.39 12.80 13.25 13.75 14.28 14.74 15.37 15.98 16.68 17.40
9117 Cook 2 16 2476 2555 2664 2769 2892 3016 3152 3300 3458 3623
14.28 14.74 15.37 15.98 16.68 17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95 20.90
4103 Custodial Services Coordinator 13 2218 2297 2383 2476 2555 2664 2769 2892 3016 3152
12.80 13.25 13.75 14.28 14.74 15.37 15.98 16.68 17.40 18.18
4101 Custodian 11 2079 2147 2218 2297 2383 2476 2555 2664 2769 2892
11.99 12.39 12.80 13.25 13.75 14.28 14.74 15.37 15.98 16.68
6391 Dental Assistant 2 17 2555 2664 2769 2892 3016 3152 3300 3458 3623 3796
14.74 15.37 15.98 16.68 17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95 20.90 21.90
6396 Dental Hygienist 30 4581 4800 5037 5285 5546 5810 6096 6391 6705 7029
26.43 27.69 29.06 30.49 32.00 33.52 35.17 36.87 38.68 40.55
2316 Early Childhood Assistant 12 2147 2218 2297 2383 2476 2555 2664 2769 2892 3016
12.39 12.80 13.25 13.75 14.28 14.74 15.37 15.98 16.68 17.40
2315 Early Childhood Associate Teacher 17 2555 2664 2769 2892 3016 3152 3300 3458 3623 3796
14.74 15.37 15.98 16.68 17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95 20.90 21.90
2146 Editor 18 2664 2769 2892 3016 3152 3300 3458 3623 3796 3975
15.37 15.98 16.68 17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95 20.90 21.90 22.93
2145 Editor Assistant 15 2383 2476 2555 2664 2769 2892 3016 3152 3300 3458
13.75 14.28 14.74 15.37 15.98 16.68 17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95
2312 Education Program Assistant 1 18 2664 2769 2892 3016 3152 3300 3458 3623 3796 3975
15.37 15.98 16.68 17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95 20.90 21.90 22.93
2313 Education Program Assistant 2 20 2892 3016 3152 3300 3458 3623 3796 3975 4175 4372
16.68 17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95 20.90 21.90 22.93 24.09 25.22
2309 Education Project Assistant 11 2079 2147 2218 2297 2383 2476 2555 2664 2769 2892
11.99 12.39 12.80 13.25 13.75 14.28 14.74 15.37 15.98 16.68
4248 Electrical/Control System Technician 25T         4504 4722 4968 5217 5472 5730
        25.99 27.24 28.66 30.10 31.57 33.06
4213 Electrician 24T         4304 4504 4722 4968 5217 5472
        24.83 25.99 27.24 28.66 30.10 31.57
3901 Environmental Health & Safety Professional 1 19 2769 2892 3016 3152 3300 3458 3623 3796 3975 4175
15.98 16.68 17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95 20.90 21.90 22.93 24.09
3902 Environmental Health & Safety Professional 2 24 3458 3623 3796 3975 4175 4372 4581 4800 5037 5285
19.95 20.90 21.90 22.93 24.09 25.22 26.43 27.69 29.06 30.49
3903 Environmental Health & Safety Professional 3 27 3975 4175 4372 4581 4800 5037 5285 5546 5810 6096
22.93 24.09 25.22 26.43 27.69 29.06 30.49 32.00 33.52 35.17
4421 Equipment Operator 2 17B         3016 3152 3300 3458 3623 3796
        17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95 20.90 21.90
118 Executive Support Specialist 1 17 2555 2664 2769 2892 3016 3152 3300 3458 3623 3796
14.74 15.37 15.98 16.68 17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95 20.90 21.90
119 Executive Support Specialist 2 19 2769 2892 3016 3152 3300 3458 3623 3796 3975 4175
15.98 16.68 17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95 20.90 21.90 22.93 24.09
3253 Facilities Engineer 3 32 5037 5285 5546 5810 6096 6391 6705 7029 7378 7731
29.06 30.49 32.00 33.52 35.17 36.87 38.68 40.55 42.57 44.60
1205 Fiscal Coordinator 1 25 3623 3796 3975 4175 4372 4581 4800 5037 5285 5546
20.90 21.90 22.93 24.09 25.22 26.43 27.69 29.06 30.49 32.00
1207 Fiscal Coordinator 2 29 4372 4581 4800 5037 5285 5546 5810 6096 6391 6705
25.22 26.43 27.69 29.06 30.49 32.00 33.52 35.17 36.87 38.68
9103 Food Service Coordinator 17 2555 2664 2769 2892 3016 3152 3300 3458 3623 3796
14.74 15.37 15.98 16.68 17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95 20.90 21.90
9100 Food Service Worker 1 7         2079 2147 2218 2297 2383 2476
        11.99 12.39 12.80 13.25 13.75 14.28
9101 Food Service Worker 2 9     2079 2147 2218 2297 2383 2476 2555 2664
    11.99 12.39 12.80 13.25 13.75 14.28 14.74 15.37
9102 Food Service Worker 3 12 2147 2218 2297 2383 2476 2555 2664 2769 2892 3016
12.39 12.80 13.25 13.75 14.28 14.74 15.37 15.98 16.68 17.40
4409 General Maintenance Mechanic 18B         3152 3300 3458 3623 3796 3975
        18.18 19.04 19.95 20.90 21.90 22.93
430 Grants/Contracts Coordinator 24 3458 3623 3796 3975 4175 4372 4581 4800 5037 5285
19.95 20.90 21.90 22.93 24.09 25.22 26.43 27.69 29.06 30.49
202 Grants/Contracts Technician 19 2769 2892 3016 3152 3300 3458 3623 3796 3975 4175
15.98 16.68 17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95 20.90 21.90 22.93 24.09
2511 Graphic Designer 21 3016 3152 3300 3458 3623 3796 3975 4175 4372 4581
17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95 20.90 21.90 22.93 24.09 25.22 26.43
4109 Grounds Maintenance Worker 1 14 2297 2383 2476 2555 2664 2769 2892 3016 3152 3300
13.25 13.75 14.28 14.74 15.37 15.98 16.68 17.40 18.18 19.04
4110 Grounds Maintenance Worker 2 16 2476 2555 2664 2769 2892 3016 3152 3300 3458 3623
14.28 14.74 15.37 15.98 16.68 17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95 20.90
4112 HVAC Control Technician 20B         3458 3623 3796 3975 4175 4372
        19.95 20.90 21.90 22.93 24.09 25.22
3160 Instrument Technician 1 - MECH 17 2555 2664 2769 2892 3016 3152 3300 3458 3623 3796
14.74 15.37 15.98 16.68 17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95 20.90 21.90
3172 Instrument Technician 3- Electrical 21 3016 3152 3300 3458 3623 3796 3975 4175 4372 4581
17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95 20.90 21.90 22.93 24.09 25.22 26.43
709 Inventory Control Specialist 16 2476 2555 2664 2769 2892 3016 3152 3300 3458 3623
14.28 14.74 15.37 15.98 16.68 17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95 20.90
6805 Laboratory Aide 10   2079 2147 2218 2297 2383 2476 2555 2664 2769
  11.99 12.39 12.80 13.25 13.75 14.28 14.74 15.37 15.98
6880 Laboratory Animal Technician 1 11 2079 2147 2218 2297 2383 2476 2555 2664 2769 2892
11.99 12.39 12.80 13.25 13.75 14.28 14.74 15.37 15.98 16.68
6881 Laboratory Animal Technician 2 14 2297 2383 2476 2555 2664 2769 2892 3016 3152 3300
13.25 13.75 14.28 14.74 15.37 15.98 16.68 17.40 18.18 19.04
6807 Laboratory Assistant 12 2147 2218 2297 2383 2476 2555 2664 2769 2892 3016
12.39 12.80 13.25 13.75 14.28 14.74 15.37 15.98 16.68 17.40
6810 Laboratory Technician 1 15 2383 2476 2555 2664 2769 2892 3016 3152 3300 3458
13.75 14.28 14.74 15.37 15.98 16.68 17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95
6811 Laboratory Technician 2 19 2769 2892 3016 3152 3300 3458 3623 3796 3975 4175
15.98 16.68 17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95 20.90 21.90 22.93 24.09
4115 Laborer 1 11 2079 2147 2218 2297 2383 2476 2555 2664 2769 2892
11.99 12.39 12.80 13.25 13.75 14.28 14.74 15.37 15.98 16.68
4116 Laborer 2 14 2297 2383 2476 2555 2664 2769 2892 3016 3152 3300
13.25 13.75 14.28 14.74 15.37 15.98 16.68 17.40 18.18 19.04
300 Library Technician 1 13 2218 2297 2383 2476 2555 2664 2769 2892 3016 3152
12.80 13.25 13.75 14.28 14.74 15.37 15.98 16.68 17.40 18.18
301 Library Technician 2 16 2476 2555 2664 2769 2892 3016 3152 3300 3458 3623
14.28 14.74 15.37 15.98 16.68 17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95 20.90
302 Library Technician 3 19 2769 2892 3016 3152 3300 3458 3623 3796 3975 4175
15.98 16.68 17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95 20.90 21.90 22.93 24.09
6135 Licensed Practical Nurse 18 2664 2769 2892 3016 3152 3300 3458 3623 3796 3975
15.37 15.98 16.68 17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95 20.90 21.90 22.93
4227 Locksmith 18B         3152 3300 3458 3623 3796 3975
        18.18 19.04 19.95 20.90 21.90 22.93
405 Mail Services Assistant 9     2079 2147 2218 2297 2383 2476 2555 2664
    11.99 12.39 12.80 13.25 13.75 14.28 14.74 15.37
4118 Maintenance Laborer Coordinator 17 2555 2664 2769 2892 3016 3152 3300 3458 3623 3796
14.74 15.37 15.98 16.68 17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95 20.90 21.90
1181 Management Analyst 2 23 3300 3458 3623 3796 3975 4175 4372 4581 4800 5037
19.04 19.95 20.90 21.90 22.93 24.09 25.22 26.43 27.69 29.06
6107 Medical Aide 15 2383 2476 2555 2664 2769 2892 3016 3152 3300 3458
13.75 14.28 14.74 15.37 15.98 16.68 17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95
6820 Medical Laboratory Techinican 1 15 2383 2476 2555 2664 2769 2892 3016 3152 3300 3458
13.75 14.28 14.74 15.37 15.98 16.68 17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95
6823 Medical Laboratory Technologist 23 3300 3458 3623 3796 3975 4175 4372 4581 4800 5037
19.04 19.95 20.90 21.90 22.93 24.09 25.22 26.43 27.69 29.06
15 Medical Records Specialist 15 2383 2476 2555 2664 2769 2892 3016 3152 3300 3458
13.75 14.28 14.74 15.37 15.98 16.68 17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95
11 Medical Transcriptionist 15 2383 2476 2555 2664 2769 2892 3016 3152 3300 3458
13.75 14.28 14.74 15.37 15.98 16.68 17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95
6258 Mid-Level Medical Practitioner 35 5810 6096 6391 6705 7029 7378 7731 8102 8489 8892
33.52 35.17 36.87 38.68 40.55 42.57 44.60 46.74 48.98 51.30
2121 Museum Assistant 12 2147 2218 2297 2383 2476 2555 2664 2769 2892 3016
12.39 12.80 13.25 13.75 14.28 14.74 15.37 15.98 16.68 17.40
4295 Museum Technician 14 2297 2383 2476 2555 2664 2769 2892 3016 3152 3300
13.25 13.75 14.28 14.74 15.37 15.98 16.68 17.40 18.18 19.04
102 Office Assistant 10   2079 2147 2218 2297 2383 2476 2555 2664 2769
  11.99 12.39 12.80 13.25 13.75 14.28 14.74 15.37 15.98
103 Office Specialist 1 12 2147 2218 2297 2383 2476 2555 2664 2769 2892 3016
12.39 12.80 13.25 13.75 14.28 14.74 15.37 15.98 16.68 17.40
104 Office Specialist 2 15 2383 2476 2555 2664 2769 2892 3016 3152 3300 3458
13.75 14.28 14.74 15.37 15.98 16.68 17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95
4209 Painter 18B         3152 3300 3458 3623 3796 3975
        18.18 19.04 19.95 20.90 21.90 22.93
5550 Parking Services Representative 12 2147 2218 2297 2383 2476 2555 2664 2769 2892 3016
12.39 12.80 13.25 13.75 14.28 14.74 15.37 15.98 16.68 17.40
205 Payroll Technician 15 2383 2476 2555 2664 2769 2892 3016 3152 3300 3458
13.75 14.28 14.74 15.37 15.98 16.68 17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95
6260 Pharmacist 35 5810 6096 6391 6705 7029 7378 7731 8102 8489 8892
33.52 35.17 36.87 38.68 40.55 42.57 44.60 46.74 48.98 51.30
6271 Pharmacist Technician 2 17 2555 2664 2769 2892 3016 3152 3300 3458 3623 3796
14.74 15.37 15.98 16.68 17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95 20.90 21.90
6503 Physical Therapist 31 4800 5037 5285 5546 5810 6096 6391 6705 7029 7378
27.69 29.06 30.49 32.00 33.52 35.17 36.87 38.68 40.55 42.57
4245 Pipe & Steam Fitter 23B         3975 4175 4372 4581 4800 5037
        22.93 24.09 25.22 26.43 27.69 29.06
4211 Plumber 23B         3975 4175 4372 4581 4800 5037
        22.93 24.09 25.22 26.43 27.69 29.06
2477 Print Services Technician 16 2476 2555 2664 2769 2892 3016 3152 3300 3458 3623
14.28 14.74 15.37 15.98 16.68 17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95 20.90
816 Program Representative 1 22 3152 3300 3458 3623 3796 3975 4175 4372 4581 4800
18.18 19.04 19.95 20.90 21.90 22.93 24.09 25.22 26.43 27.69
817 Program Representative 2 26 3796 3975 4175 4372 4581 4800 5037 5285 5546 5810
21.90 22.93 24.09 25.22 26.43 27.69 29.06 30.49 32.00 33.52
812 Program Technician 1 23 3300 3458 3623 3796 3975 4175 4372 4581 4800 5037
19.04 19.95 20.90 21.90 22.93 24.09 25.22 26.43 27.69 29.06
813 Program Technician 2 27 3975 4175 4372 4581 4800 5037 5285 5546 5810 6096
22.93 24.09 25.22 26.43 27.69 29.06 30.49 32.00 33.52 35.17
706 Property Specialist 2 14 2297 2383 2476 2555 2664 2769 2892 3016 3152 3300
13.25 13.75 14.28 14.74 15.37 15.98 16.68 17.40 18.18 19.04
6298 Psychometrician 16 2476 2555 2664 2769 2892 3016 3152 3300 3458 3623
14.28 14.74 15.37 15.98 16.68 17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95 20.90
2110 Public Information Assistant 17 2555 2664 2769 2892 3016 3152 3300 3458 3623 3796
14.74 15.37 15.98 16.68 17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95 20.90 21.90
2111 Public Information Representative 1 21 3016 3152 3300 3458 3623 3796 3975 4175 4372 4581
17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95 20.90 21.90 22.93 24.09 25.22 26.43
2112 Public Information Representative 2 25 3623 3796 3975 4175 4372 4581 4800 5037 5285 5546
20.90 21.90 22.93 24.09 25.22 26.43 27.69 29.06 30.49 32.00
2147 Publications Editor 21 3016 3152 3300 3458 3623 3796 3975 4175 4372 4581
17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95 20.90 21.90 22.93 24.09 25.22 26.43
768 Purchasing Analyst 2 24 3458 3623 3796 3975 4175 4372 4581 4800 5037 5285
19.95 20.90 21.90 22.93 24.09 25.22 26.43 27.69 29.06 30.49
6347 Radiologic Technologist 1 20 2892 3016 3152 3300 3458 3623 3796 3975 4175 4372
16.68 17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95 20.90 21.90 22.93 24.09 25.22
4470 Refrigeration Mechanic 23B         3975 4175 4372 4581 4800 5037
        22.93 24.09 25.22 26.43 27.69 29.06
6224 Registered Nurse 1 28 4175 4372 4581 4800 5037 5285 5546 5810 6096 6391
24.09 25.22 26.43 27.69 29.06 30.49 32.00 33.52 35.17 36.87
6225 Registered Nurse 2 30 4581 4800 5037 5285 5546 5810 6096 6391 6705 7029
26.43 27.69 29.06 30.49 32.00 33.52 35.17 36.87 38.68 40.55
1115 Research Analyst 1 17 2555 2664 2769 2892 3016 3152 3300 3458 3623 3796
14.74 15.37 15.98 16.68 17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95 20.90 21.90
1116 Research Analyst 2 21 3016 3152 3300 3458 3623 3796 3975 4175 4372 4581
17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95 20.90 21.90 22.93 24.09 25.22 26.43
1117 Research Analyst 3 26 3796 3975 4175 4372 4581 4800 5037 5285 5546 5810
21.90 22.93 24.09 25.22 26.43 27.69 29.06 30.49 32.00 33.52
5111 Revenue Agent 2 18 2664 2769 2892 3016 3152 3300 3458 3623 3796 3975
15.37 15.98 16.68 17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95 20.90 21.90 22.93
6870 Science Lab Preparator 20 2892 3016 3152 3300 3458 3623 3796 3975 4175 4372
16.68 17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95 20.90 21.90 22.93 24.09 25.22
2150 Science/Technical Editor 21 3016 3152 3300 3458 3623 3796 3975 4175 4372 4581
17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95 20.90 21.90 22.93 24.09 25.22 26.43
2512 Senior Graphic Designer 24 3458 3623 3796 3975 4175 4372 4581 4800 5037 5285
19.95 20.90 21.90 22.93 24.09 25.22 26.43 27.69 29.06 30.49
6612 Social Services Specialist 1 24 3458 3623 3796 3975 4175 4372 4581 4800 5037 5285
19.95 20.90 21.90 22.93 24.09 25.22 26.43 27.69 29.06 30.49
6613 Social Services Specialist 2 26 3796 3975 4175 4372 4581 4800 5037 5285 5546 5810
21.90 22.93 24.09 25.22 26.43 27.69 29.06 30.49 32.00 33.52
2392 Stage Production Coordinator 15 2383 2476 2555 2664 2769 2892 3016 3152 3300 3458
13.75 14.28 14.74 15.37 15.98 16.68 17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95
4249 Stationary Engineer 21 3016 3152 3300 3458 3623 3796 3975 4175 4372 4581
17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95 20.90 21.90 22.93 24.09 25.22 26.43
1495 Telecommunications Analyst 2 24 3458 3623 3796 3975 4175 4372 4581 4800 5037 5285
19.95 20.90 21.90 22.93 24.09 25.22 26.43 27.69 29.06 30.49
1491 Telecommunications Technician 1 20 2892 3016 3152 3300 3458 3623 3796 3975 4175 4372
16.68 17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95 20.90 21.90 22.93 24.09 25.22
6500 Therapy Aide 11 2079 2147 2218 2297 2383 2476 2555 2664 2769 2892
11.99 12.39 12.80 13.25 13.75 14.28 14.74 15.37 15.98 16.68
4123 Trades/Maintenance Coordinator 21T         3752 3927 4115 4319 4536 4751
        21.65 22.66 23.74 24.92 26.17 27.41
4120 Trades/Maintenance Worker 1 13 2218 2297 2383 2476 2555 2664 2769 2892 3016 3152
12.80 13.25 13.75 14.28 14.74 15.37 15.98 16.68 17.40 18.18
4121 Trades/Maintenance Worker 2 17 2555 2664 2769 2892 3016 3152 3300 3458 3623 3796
14.74 15.37 15.98 16.68 17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95 20.90 21.90
4403 Transporter 11B         2383 2476 2555 2664 2769 2892
        13.75 14.28 14.74 15.37 15.98 16.68
2140 University Development Project Coordinator 1 21 3016 3152 3300 3458 3623 3796 3975 4175 4372 4581
17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95 20.90 21.90 22.93 24.09 25.22 26.43
2175 Videographer 1 18 2664 2769 2892 3016 3152 3300 3458 3623 3796 3975
15.37 15.98 16.68 17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95 20.90 21.90 22.93
2176 Videographer 2 19 2769 2892 3016 3152 3300 3458 3623 3796 3975 4175
15.98 16.68 17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95 20.90 21.90 22.93 24.09
4142 Warehouse Coordinator 15 2383 2476 2555 2664 2769 2892 3016 3152 3300 3458
13.75 14.28 14.74 15.37 15.98 16.68 17.40 18.18 19.04 19.95
4140 Warehouse Worker 11 2079 2147 2218 2297 2383 2476 2555 2664 2769 2892
11.99 12.39 12.80 13.25 13.75 14.28 14.74 15.37 15.98 16.68
531 Word Processing Technician 2 13 2218 2297 2383 2476 2555 2664 2769 2892 3016 3152
12.80 13.25 13.75 14.28 14.74 15.37 15.98 16.68 17.40 18.18

Information Technology Positions

Class Number Class Title Salary Range Low Control High
1460 Operations Specialist 21I-1 2462 3742 3909
14.20 21.59 22.55
1460 Operations Specialist 21I-2 3097 4707 4786
17.87 27.16 27.61
1461 Equipment Systems Specialist 26I-1 2619 3981 4201
15.11 22.97 24.24
1461 Equipment Systems Specialist 26I-2 3327 5057 6038
19.19 29.18 34.84
1462 Information Technology Consultant 28I-1 2465 3747 3915
14.22 21.62 22.59
1462 Information Technology Consultant 28I-2 3101 4713 5746
17.89 27.19 33.15
1462 Information Technology Consultant 28I-3 4038 6137 6548
23.30 35.41 37.78
1463 Operating Systems/Network Analyst 32I-1 2965 4507 4830
17.11 26.00 27.87
1463 Operating Systems/Network Analyst 32I-2 3821 5808 7091
22.04 33.51 40.91
1463 Operating Systems/Network Analyst 32I-3 4982 7572 7955
28.74 43.69 45.90
1464 Analyst Programmer 34I-1 3243 4930 5307
18.71 28.44 30.62
1464 Analyst Programmer 34I-2 4198 6381 7791
24.22 36.81 44.95
1464 Analyst Programmer 34I-3 5475 8322 8682
31.59 48.01 50.09

 

Teamsters Monthly Salary Schedule

Effective July 1, 2014

Classifications currently in use at the University of Oregon.

Printable option: View a printable version.

# Title Salary Range Step 1 Step 2 Step 3 Step 4 Step 5 Step 6 Step 7 Step 8 Step 9 Step 10
2411 Bindery Assistant 12         2,164
13.32
2,263
13.93
2,372
14.60
2,480
15.26
2,601
16.01
2,720
16.74
2412 Bindery Worker 17         2,720
16.74
2,846
17.51
2,993
18.42
3,141
19.33
3,291
20.26
3,459
21.29
2466 Camera, Stripping, Platemaker 17         2,720
16.64
2,846
17.51
2,993
18.42
3,141
19.33
3,291
20.26
3,429
21.29
2459 Electronic Pre-Press Specialist 19         2,993
18.42
3,141
19.33
3,292
20.26
3,459
21.29
3,631
22.34
3,814
23.47
4115 Laborer 1 11         2,069
12.70
2,164
13.32
2,263
13.93
2,372
14.60
2,480
15.26
2,601
16.01
4116 Laborer 2 14 1,982
12.19
2,069
12.73
2,164
13.32
2,263
13.93
2,372
14.60
2,480
15.26
2,601
16.01
2,720
16.74
2,846
17.51
2,993
18.42
2460 Photocomposition Specialist 15         2,480
15.26
2,601
16.01
2,720
16.74
2,846
17.51
2,993
18.42
3,141
19.33
2441 Printing Press Operator 17, 19, 21                    
      Printing Press Operator
Level 1
17         2,720
16.74
2,846
17.51
2,993
18.42
3,141
19.33
3,291
20.26
3,459
21.29
     Printing Press Operator
Level 2
19         2,993
18.42
3,141
19.33
3,292
20.26
3,459
21.29
3,631
22.34
3,814
2,347
      Printing Press Operator
Level 3
21         3,292
20.26
3,459
21.29
3,631
22.34
3,814
23.47
4,004
24.64
4,204
25.82
2476 Printing Trade Coordinator 23         3,631
22.34
3,814
23.47
4,004
24.64
4,204
25.87
4,408
27.12
4,628
28.48

 

Teamsters Article 7: Wages and Retirement

OUS Classification Specifications

New link as of 5/15/14 https://secure.ous.edu/dept/hr/classification-specs New link as of 1/2/14: http://www.ous.edu/dept/hr/classification-specs/ New link as of 1-2-13: http://www1.ous.edu/owpd/plsql/owpd_pos_list Old link: former.ous.edu/dept/hr/classification-specs/

Defining Competencies for Information Technology Classifications

Teamster Classification Specifications (exclusive to UO)

Bindery Assistant #2411

GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF CLASS

 

The BINDERY ASSISTANT performs a variety of basic hand and machine operations to gather, collate, fold, staple, or bind printed materials in a printing plant.

DISTINGUISHING FEATURES

 

This is the first level of a two‑level series and is distinguished from the higher level by the absences of setup, operation, and maintenance of the most complex equipment and procedures and by receiving guidance from higher level employees.

 

 

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

 

1.       Equipment Operation.  Typical tasks:  sets correct spacing on drills or punches to make binder holes in printed stock; feeds, offloads material and operates punching or drilling machines; loads stapler or nailer with correct wire size, adjusts guides to paper size, and feeds machine with preassembled printed materials to be "stitched;" loads or offloads stock at large collator, stitcher, or trimming equipment to assist journey operator; loads or offloads materials at perfect binder; guides and adjusts paper flow at an equipment work station on ganged, multipurpose equipment (e.g., combined collating, folding, trimming, stitching operations) through local adjustment of equipment and clearing blockages; loads, operates, and offloads shrink‑wrap or strapping equipment; uses pallet jacks to move stock from one work station to another; in some plants sets up, loads, collates, staples from small (11x17) collator‑sticher‑folder and sets up, loads and operates small (11x17) folder.

 

2.       Hand Operations.  Typical tasks:  works at "round table" (lazy susan rotating bins) or regular table to collate self‑carbon or odd‑sized paper stock into correct sequences and groups; jogs (vibrating machine to shake stock into even, squared lots); pads (applies glue to spine) preassembled lots of paper; counts or measures and calculates quantity of paper to determine correct lots in accordance with job orders; folds scored wrap around covers for some forms; fills and packs cartons with completed materials for shipment; marks or labels packages for delivery to client; performs assembly and less complicated hand binding operations at work table.

 

3.       Miscellaneous.  Typical tasks:  reviews job orders to assure correct processing and procedures; monitors materials in process to detect previous processing errors (incorrect assembly, printing errors, paper damage, etc.) and notifies supervisor if problem is serious; maintains accurate production and time records; maintains clean work site and observes appropriate safety procedures at all times; maintains current of knowledge in field by reading trade publications and attending training when provided; assists in other work areas (warehouse, mail, shipping/receiving, printing) when required.

 

 

RELATIONSHIPS WITH OTHERS

 

Employees in this classification have occasional in‑person or telephone contact with employees of other production units to coordinate processing or when assisting in other units and customers to exchange information about jobs.

 

 

SUPERVISION RECEIVED

 

Employees in this class receive work assignments and general supervision from a shift leadworker.  Work is reviewed as completed for timeliness, accuracy, and conformance with job order specifications.  Guidance is provided orally from a journey‑level bindery worker or leadworker and in writing through job order forms, unit procedures manuals, and equipment operating manuals.

 

 

GENERAL INFORMATION

 

Positions are primarily found in the production environment of a printing plant.  They require the willingness to work in the environment associated with the position's location including dust, noise and vigorous activity.

Bindery Worker #2412

GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF CLASS

 

The BINDERY WORKER performs a variety of hand and machine operations to cut, trim, sort, assemble, fold, and bind printed materials in a printing plant. 

 

 

DISTINGUISHING FEATURES

 

This is the second level of a two‑level series and is distinguished from the lower level by the set up, operation, and maintenance of the most complex equipment and procedures and the provision of guidance and direction to lower level employees.

 

 

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

 

1.       Work Planning and Setup.  Typical tasks:  examines work order and specifications to determine due dates and processes to be employed; consults with customer service representative or client to clarify orders; arranges work in processing and priority sequence; may route jobs requiring less complex hand or machine processing to bindery assistant; takes careful measurements, plans, and sets up appropriate processing equipment; provides advice to other production unit staff (composing, platemaking, press or customer service representative) regarding bindery equipment or processing requirements (borders, trims, folds, etc.) which affect their planning and set ups; advises clients regarding bindery requirements that affect layout and design planning.

 

2.       Equipment Operation and Maintenance.  Typical tasks:  sets up, operates, maintains, and repairs bindery equipment such as:  one to three knife hydraulic trimmers (including those computer controlled); simple or complex folding machines, some accommodating 4, 8, 12, 16, 24, or 32‑page signatures and requiring critical planning and measurements; perfect binders for single sheet, signature, or book production including glue selection, loading, temperature setting, and adjustment of pockets, grippers, and trimmers to job specifications; large collators, gatherers, saddle stitchers in separate or ganged processing including proper measurement and set up of parts and sections to paper size, weight and characteristics; drills, punches, perforators, staplers, padders (gluing operation), shrink wrappers, and strapping machines; may also learn to operate, maintain, and repair stock moving equipment such as manual or powered pallet jacks, forklifts, and delivery truck.

 

3.       Miscellaneous.  Typical tasks:  makes test runs of all processing machine set ups to be sure material is handled properly and meets order specifications; monitors production equipment operation, makes adjustments as required to maintain production and quality standards; provides advice and guidance to bindery assistants or trainees in equipment setup, operation, and adjustment and the performance of manual processing functions; performs preventive and corrective maintenance and repairs to all equipment according to schedule or need; replaces worn blades, gears, bearings, springs, and motors on equipment as needed; maintains accurate production, maintenance and time records; provides training, guidance, and work approval for bindery assistants and trainees as required; provides cross coverage on all machines and processes in bindery as needed; observes, practices, and promotes unit housekeeping and safety standards at all times; performs machine and hand operations to produce edition binding, library binding, and other hand binding including making and applying hinged covers; maintains current of knowledge in field by reading trade publications and attending training when provided; may learn routes and schedules to provide backup coverage for truck driver/delivery person when necessary.

 

 

RELATIONSHIPS WITH OTHERS

 

Employees in this classification have frequent in‑person or telephone contact with staff of other production units to coordinate production processes on particular jobs.  There is occasional contact with clients to clarify job specifications, to provide advice on bindery requirements or resolve problems which may affect planning and layout of printed materials.  There may be incidental contact with client employees when providing backup coverage for truck driver/delivery person.

 

 

SUPERVISION RECEIVED

 

Employees in this class receive work assignments and general supervision from a shift leadworker.  The employee normally works with considerable independence in the performance of day‑to‑day operations.  Work is reviewed as completed for timeliness and conformance to job specifications and unit production and quality standards.  Guidance is provided through consultation with leadworker and through written job specifications, plant or unit operations and procedures handbooks, and equipment operation and maintenance manuals.

 

 

GENERAL INFORMATION

 

Positions are primarily found in the production environment of a printing plant.  They require the willingness to work in the environment associated with the position's location including dust, noise, and vigorous activity.

Camera, Stripping, Platemaker #2466

 

GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF CLASS

 

The CAMERA, STRIPPING, PLATEMAKER receives instructions and hard copy which is photographed and manipulated using a variety of processes to produce printing plates.

 

 

DISTINGUISHING FEATURES

 

This is a single classification and not currently part of a series of classes.

 

 

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

 

1.       Camera Operation.  Typical tasks:  reviews job order and copy to be sure material is camera ready and to determine page sizes needed; if not clear on directions may contact customer service representative, supervisor or client, for clarification of what is wanted; if copy is not fully camera‑ready, evaluates to determine if sufficient to produce an attractive and functional product; may need to cut and paste text and graphics to create camera ready pages; mounts camera‑ready copy in front of camera lens, adjusts distance from lens to produce correct page size; installs filters or screens to produce color or tones required; sets up or adjusts lights; sets exposure time and makes final adjustments to camera and installs film; takes photo and removes film; inserts film in automatic developer or develops by hand in dark room; dries resultant negative and examines for any imperfections and if necessary retakes photo; may operate automatic negative drier; makes reductions, enlargements, or multiple images as required; uses knowledge of equipment to make technical adjustments for production of two, three, or four‑color jobs and overlay work.

 

2.       Stripping.  Typical tasks:  examines job order, past samples, artwork, dummies and any special instructions to visualize final product; selects base material based on registration requirements; upon occasion determines layout based on stock size and grain, presses to be used and printing method, scoring, perforating, numbering, die cuts, drilling, types of folding, padding, collating, binding and trimming; calculates margins and draws layout; figures imposition and head direction by making folding dummies; some jobs require additional processing such as film reverses, spreads and chokes, cutting rubylith windows, duplicate negatives, color separations, angle screens or composites;may produce a "blue line" print or prepress proof of finished layout for client review before proceeding further, may review product with customer service representative to insure it meets customer needs, reviews final product for quality, or submits to supervisor or leadworker for review and approval.

 

3.       Platemaking.  Typical tasks:  exposes light sensitized printing plates through negative flats, develops plates in automated processor, examines plate for evidence of flaws, compares finished plates to instructions on the job order as well as any artwork or dummies; takes finished plate to supervisor for review or routes to pressroom.

 

4.       Miscellaneous.  Typical tasks:  cleans, adjusts, and performs preventive or corrective maintenance on all equipment used; properly records work time by job number and appropriate function code; maintains files of completed client plates which may be reused or revised in the future; orders supplies as necessary; mixes chemical solutions used in developers and printers; provides training, guidance and advice to trainees or new employees; may collect,record and present production data when needed by supervisor or management; may assist in pressroom, bindery, or composing room when required.

 

 

RELATIONSHIPS WITH OTHERS

 

Employees in this class have frequent in‑person or telephone contact with composing, pressroom, and bindery staff to discuss order requirements and coordinate production efforts on given jobs.  There is frequent telephone or in‑person contact with clients to clarify orders or to recommend changes in order specifications for a better or less expensive product.  There is occasional in‑person or telephone contact with management staff or vendors to discuss new products being tested.

 

 

SUPERVISION RECEIVED

 

The Camera, Stripping, Plateroom receives general supervision from a Camera, Stripping Plateroom Supervisor or other printing plant supervisor.  The employee works with considerable independence regarding processes and procedures used.  Guidance is provided in the form of unit or plant handbooks setting forth production and quality standards and equipment and materials operational manuals or instruction guides.  Work is normally reviewed as complete in relation to production and quality standards.

 

 

GENERAL INFORMATION

 

Positions are primarily found in the production environment of a printing plant.  They require the willingness to work in the environment associated with the position's location including a lowly lit room with light tables and standing for prolonged periods of time.

 

 

 

KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS, AND ABILITIES (KSA)

 

          Extensive knowledge of the theory, practice, and printer's measures used

                   in paste‑up, layout, and imposition of text and graphic material in order to produce correct, high quality printing plates.

          General knowledge of the set up, operation, and maintenance of cameras,

                   developers and related equipment, and materials commonly used in printing plants.

          General knowledge of the set up, operation, and maintenance of vacuum

                   printers, light systems, plate finishers and related equipment, and materials used in a printing plant.

          General knowledge of chemicals and solutions used in plateroom equipment

                   and standards of safety required in their use.

          General knowledge of composing, press, and bindery operations as they may

                   impact platemaking operations and procedures.

 

          Skill in cut and paste, layout, and imposition processes including ability

                   to do 2, 4, 8, 12, 16, 24 or 32‑page signatures and double side printing.

          Skill in layout and imposition processes necessary to produce high quality

                   2, 3 and 4‑color and overlay plates.

          Skill in the set up, adjustment, operation, and maintenance of printing

                   plant production cameras (including floor mounted unit on 18‑foot track), developers, and related equipment.

          Skill in the set up, adjustment, and operation of plate processing and

                   related equipment.

          Skill in the use of hand tools, measures, knives, inks, and related

                   materials used to correct or enhance copy or printing plates.

          Skill in planning and adjusting layouts to create high quality printed

                   materials.

 

          Ability to assist and advise clients regarding production problems,

                   clarification of orders or copy preparation.

          Ability to maintain contact with composing, printing, and bindery staff

                   to ensure coordination of platemaking process to accommodate other unit's production or equipment requirements.

          Ability to maintain accurate production records.

          Ability to order and maintain adequate supplies of parts and materials.

          Ability to train, assist and advise new employees regarding plateroom

                   operations.

          Ability to maintain current knowledge in the field regarding equipment,

                   materials, processes, and procedures related to platemaking through reading of trade publications and attending in‑service training as provided.

          Ability to perform, observe, and accurately record testing of new

                   products, materials or equipment.

 

          NOTE:         The KNOWLEDGE and SKILLS are required for initial consideration.  ABILITIES may be required for initial consideration, at any time during the selection process, or during a trial service period as a final stage of the selection process.  Some duties performed by positions in this class may require different KSA's.  No attempt is made to describe every KSA required for all positions in this class.  Additional KSA requirements will be explained on the recruiting announcement.

 

 

Adopted 4/90

 

 

 

 

Revised

 

 

 

 

Examples of work are typical of duties assigned to this class.  No attempt is made to describe every duty performed by all positions in this class.

Electronic Pre-Press Specialist #2459

 

 

GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF CLASS

 

The ELECTRONIC PRE-PRESS SPECIALIST formats written and visual materials electronically to prepare them for printing.  Individuals in this class use specialized computer software and equipment to electronically merge graphics and text, scan photographs, make color traps and builds, format page layout, and electronically load formatted pages into high resolution devices to produce film for plate-making and printing on offset presses.

 

 

DISTINGUISHING FEATURES

 

This is a single classification and not currently part of a series of classes.

 

 

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

 

Allocations of positions to this class will depend on the total work performed which may include one or a combination of the duties or tasks listed below.

 

1.   Pre-press Composition  

 

Processes files through image processor to high-resolution output device and prints files/produces negatives on same.  Creates on-screen designs and text or other electronic media; develops color traps, produces graduated screens and color builds, scans and corrects art and photos, and produces formatted page layout with register marks and page imposition.

 

2.  Electronic Typesetting

 

Keys in directions for formatting, type size, and style; keys in copy; interprets copy edit marks and keys in corrections, footnotes, or other special requirements; makes provision for open space for graphics as needed; may create computer graphic or digitize graphic to place into document;  plans each page to accommodate required borders, printing fold and binder edges; loads completed discs or tapes into electronic phototypesetter; proofs printed copy for errors; records customer identification, time worked, and job storage; stores appropriate tape or disc or enters into computer memory; forwards completed job to customer for review or to stripping for further production processing.

 

3.  Orientation/Training

 

Trains users outside the department in techniques/skills necessary to improve electronic interaction with printing services; answers questions about software applications; Contacts customers for clarification on order information, to explain production problems in formatting or suggest more economical or appropriate software typestyle or formatting.

 

 

4.  Miscellaneous

 

Changes chemical and solutions in photoprocessing equipment; changes rolls of photosensitive paper, film, and changes or transfers discs; electronically assembles negative imposition layouts into position for press run; downloads and uploads data between mainframe computer and typesetting equipment; communicates with pressroom, plateroom, and bindery to coordinate and adjust typesetting to needs or limitations of other operations; may train new employees in techniques and the operation and maintenance of equipment used.

 

 

RELATIONSHIPS WITH OTHERS

 

Employees in this class have regular telephone or in-person contact with strippers, pressroom, bindery staff or camera room to exchange information about particular jobs to assure that composition made will accommodate equipment or other production considerations of the other units.  There is frequent in-person or telephone contact with customers to obtain clarification about a job order or to recommend composition changes based on customer needs.

 

 

SUPERVISION RECEIVED

 

Employees in this class, once proficient on the job, receive general supervision from the supervisor.  Work assignments are usually in the form of a written work order which gives specifics as to how a job is to be set up for the customer.  Problems encountered may be clarified by the supervisor or client.  Guidelines include employer provided standards of production and quality control and manuals or directions for the operation and maintenance of equipment. 

 

 

GENERAL INFORMATION

 

Positions are primarily found in the production environment of a printing department and because of current technology, only occasionally expose individuals to noise or chemicals previously associated with the trade.

 

 

KNOWLEDGE AND SKILLS (KS)

 

  • Extensive knowledge of the theory, practice, and printer's measures used in layout and imposition of text and graphic material in order to produce correct, high quality printing film.
  • General knowledge of composing, press, and bindery operations as they may impact pre-press operations and procedures.
  • General knowledge of a variety of type faces, sizes, and styles used in printing.
  • General knowledge of how to properly measure, plan for, and set justified lines or blocks of text to create a balanced, readable page of printed material.
  • General knowledge of the printing process in order to plan and set type to accommodate required borders, press gripper lines and bindery fold, cut, trim, or stitching lines for each completed page.
  • General knowledge of the operation and maintenance of electronic typesetting and auxiliary equipment.
  • General knowledge of editing marks to recognize and accommodate editorial changes in copy to be set.
  • General knowledge of computerized typesetting equipment and procedures.
  • Basic knowledge of telecommunication typesetting equipment and procedures.
  • Skill in layout, and imposition processes including ability to do 2, 4, 8, 12, 16, 24 or 32-page signatures and double side printing.
  • Skill in layout and imposition processes necessary to produce high quality 2, 3 and 4-color and overlay film.
  • Skill in planning and adjusting layouts to create high quality printed materials.
  • Skill in set up, operation, and maintenance of electronic typesetting and auxiliary equipment,including mixture and loading of photoprocessing chemicals and solutions.
  • Skill in layout, imposition, electronic paste-up and use of current page layout software programs to accomplish color traps, graduated screens, photo scanning and photo-screen adjustments for out-putting to film.

 

NOTE:  The KNOWLEDGE and SKILLS are required for initial consideration.  Some duties performed by positions in this class may require different KS's.  No attempt is made to describe every KS required for all positions in this class.  Additional KS requirements will be explained on the recruiting announcement.

 

 

Adopted       5/95

 

Revised

 

STATE OF OREGON

Dept. of Administrative Services

Human Resource Management Division

Laborer 1 #4115

    

 

GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF CLASS

 

The LABORER 1 performs a wide variety of unskilled tasks requiring sustained physical effort and the use of hand tools and simple power equipment such as drills and saws.

 

 

DISTINGUISHING FEATURES

 

This is the first level of a two‑level series.  It is distinguished from the higher level by the close supervision received, by the absence of responsibility for maintaining detailed records of work performed, and by the absence of responsibility for using or operating large power equipment.  (Employees in this class may occasionally use large power equipment such as jackhammers or bulldozers under close guidance of higher level personnel.)

 

 

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

 

Allocation of positions to this class will depend on the total work performed which may include one or a combination of the duties or tasks listed below.

 

1.       General Labor.  Typical tasks:  mows lawns; rakes leaves; pulls weeds; prunes shrubs; collects and disposes of debris and trash; digs ditches; cuts and hauls wood; cleans walkways, restrooms, roofs, work areas; assists skilled workers with building maintenance (painting, plumbing, roof repair) by hauling materials, holding pipe and erecting scaffolding; assists in breaking up concrete and building forms for new concrete; pumps gas; washes vehicles; picks up and delivers vehicles, parts, supplies, audiovisual equipment, books and furniture within an agency; replaces light bulbs; picks up and delivers agency/campus mail by motorized vehicle; sets up and takes down such things as tables, chairs, display cases, exhibits, and partitions; flags traffic; tends bridge gates.

 

2.       Warehouse Labor.  Typical task:  places materials and merchandise on or removes materials and merchandise from pallets and conveyor belts; packs and unpacks boxes, cartons, cases; loads and unloads boxcars, trucks, ships using hand trucks, dollies, and other moving and loading equipment; checks items received against invoices; assists in taking physical inventory count of warehouse stock; stocks shelves and rotates items with limited life span.

 

3.       Forestry Labor.  Typical tasks:  clear trails of unwanted debris; removes brush from roadsides; participates in controlled burning of forest debris as a member of a "holding crew"; digs fire trails clearing a path to mineral soil in front of fire using shovels, axes, hoes, and pulaskies; uses water from fire engines to cool a fire or put fire out; mops up after a burn is complete by turning over burned material and soil with hand tools and applying water to hot spots; cleans fire engines; restocks trucks with tools and materials used on fires.

 

4.       Natural Resource Labor.  Typical tasks:  maintains hatchery facility by cleaning ponds, screens, racks; counts, marks and sorts fish and fish eggs; maintains State‑owned roads, beaches and trails; provides care and feeding to animals and livestock; weighs, marks and tags animals to keep track of their health and location; selects samples of produce to be inspected by a shipping point inspector from a storage area; carries sample to grading area and places sample on grading table or conveyor belt; performs uncomplicated sorting tasks such as removing rocks and clods at the grading table; loads and unloads equipment from vehicles and reassembles equipment; cleans up inspection area; places insect detection traps at predesignated sites, removes traps at specified times; under close supervision applies herbicides and pesticides.

 

 

RELATIONSHIPS WITH OTHERS

 

Work contacts for employees in this class will vary greatly depending on the assignment.  Employees will be in daily contact in person with other labor and skilled trade workers, as well as supervisors, to receive work assignments and other instructions.  Employees may also come in contact in person with the public, various levels of staff from other State agencies, students, institutional inmates, and others, depending on the work situation.

 

 

SUPERVISION RECEIVED

 

Employees in this class receive close supervision from first‑line supervisor.  Work is assigned in detail and reviewed daily to ensure it is completed satisfactorily and on a timely basis.  As Laborer 1's develop advanced proficiency in the performance of tasks, supervision will become more general.

 

Employees must adhere to agency and State safety rules in the work areas and will be expected to gain familiarity with State and agency rules and regulations governing operating procedures.

 

 

GENERAL INFORMATION

 

Positions are found in central and remote locations throughout State government (e.g., general government agencies, human or natural resource agencies, correctional, mental health, or higher education institutions, hospitals, etc.).  They require the willingness to work within the environment associated with the position's location.

 

They require the willingness to work outdoors in inclement weather.  They require the willingness to walk, stand, and work while bending and stooping for extended periods.  They require the willingness to work from ladders, scaffolds, and other above‑ground locations such as on roofs.  They require the willingness to work in an environment containing dust, odor, and high  levels of noise.  They require the willingness to lift and carry heavy objects.  Some positions may require the willingness to work with or around chemicals and caustic compounds such as pesticides, herbicides, disinfectants, and cleaning agents.  Some positions require the willingness to work around forest fires.

 

KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS, AND ABILITIES (KSA)

 

          Ability to perform prolonged strenuous physical labor.

          Ability to follow oral and written instructions and perform assigned

                   tasks.

          Ability to learn and use small tools and equipment.

 

          Some positions in this class may require one or more of the following:

 

          Basic knowledge of spoken and written English sufficient to understand

                   instructions.

 

          Ability to pass a physical examination.

          Ability to maintain harmonious working relationships with all levels of

                   agency staff, clients, inmates, and the public.

 

 

          SPECIAL QUALIFICATIONS

 

          Some positions in this class may require the possession of an Oregon driver's license valid for the class of vehicles used by the employing agencies.

 

          NOTE:  The KNOWLEDGE and SKILLS are required for initial consideration.  ABILITIES may be required for initial consideration, at any time during the selection process, or during a trial service period as a final stage of the selection process.  Some duties performed by positions in this class may require different KSA's.  No attempt is made to describe every KSA required for all positions in this class.  Additional KSA requirements will be explained on the recruiting announcement.

 

 

Adopted 1/90

 

 

Revised

 

 

Examples of work are typical of duties assigned to this class.  No attempt is made to describe every duty performed by all positions in this class.

Laborer 2 #4116

                              

 

GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF CLASS

 

The LABORER 2 performs a wide variety of routine and semiskilled tasks, requiring sustained physical effort and the use of large power equipment such as jackhammers, tractors, and road graders.

 

 

DISTINGUISHING FEATURES

 

This is the second level of a two‑level series.  It is distinguished from the lower level by the general nature of supervision received, by increased record keeping requirements and by the operation of large power equipment and vehicles. 

 

 

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

 

Allocation of positions to this class will depend on the total work performed which may include one or a combination of the duties or tasks listed below.

 

1.       General Labor.  Typical tasks:  breaks up concrete with jackhammers; builds forms for new concrete; uses power equipment for basic building maintenance; operates power shears, brush chippers, and other power equipment used in landscape maintenance; performs basic maintenance and repair on equipment; assists craftsmen in their work by performing such tasks as basic carpentry and plumbing; operates, adjusts and maintains high‑speed inserting, folding and metering equipment; maintains work records as required.

 

2.       Warehouse Labor.  Typical tasks:  packs and unpacks merchandise and verifies contents against shipping documents; operates forklifts and conveyors to move items around facility; organizes incoming and outgoing shipments; keeps detailed records concerning articles shipped, the motor carriers involved, delivery points, damage, and loss.

 

3.       Forestry Labor.  Typical tasks:  inspects the work of contracted tree planting crews to ensure that terms of contract are met (sampling the number, density and quality of trees planted); checks and records seedling survival rates in previously planted forests; measures heights, diameters, and distances of trees in preparation for timber sales; marks timber sale boundaries and clears logging roads; drives small fire engines (200‑gallon capacity or less); sets up portable pumps and tanks; lays out hoses, nozzles and fittings in a predetermined manner to apply the most effective fire fighting actions for a given situation; digs fire trails clearing a path to mineral soil in front of fire; uses water and soil to cool or put out fires; mops up after a burn is complete by turning over burned material with hand tools and applying water to hot spots; performs minor maintenance, cleaning and repair of vehicles and equipment used in fighting forest fires.

 

4.       Natural Resource Labor.  Typical tasks:  conducts ground surveys by inspecting plants in a predetermined area for insects (places and retrieves insect traps) and disease, records results and reports to superior; operates tractor to prepare ground for cultivation; services vehicles and equipment used; applies insecticides, herbicides, fungicides, and fertilizers in prescribed manner; collects field information on wildlife populations and movements.

 

5.       Miscellaneous.  Typical tasks:  requisitions supplies needed for assigned duties and tasks; coordinates the work of and provides guidance to lower level personnel; performs duties and responsibilities of lower level personnel as needed.

 

 

RELATIONSHIPS WITH OTHERS

 

Work contacts for employees in this class will vary greatly depending on the assignment.  Employees will be in daily contact with other labor and skilled trades workers, as well as operations supervisors, to receive work assignments and other instructions.  Employees may also come in contact with the public, various levels of staff from other State agencies, students, institutional inmates, and others depending on the work situation.

 

 

SUPERVISION RECEIVED

 

Employees in this class work under general supervision of an operations supervisor who reviews work upon completion for thoroughness and adequacy.  Employees must adhere to agency and State safety rules in the work area, and use State and agency rules and regulations governing operating procedures in the performance of their duties.

 

 

GENERAL INFORMATION

 

Positions are found in central and remote locations throughout State government (e.g., general government agencies, human or natural resource agencies, correctional, mental health, or higher education institutions, hospitals, etc.).  They require the willingness to work within the environment associated with the position's location.

 

They require the willingness to work outdoors in inclement weather.  They require the willingness to walk, stand, and work while bending and stooping for extended periods.  They require the willingness to work from ladders, scaffolds, and other above‑ground locations such as on roofs.  They require the willingness to work in an environment containing dust, odor, and high levels of noise.  They require the willingness to lift and carry heavy objects.  Some positions may require the willingness to work with or around chemicals and caustic compounds such as pesticides, herbicides, disinfectants and cleaning agents.  Some positions require the willingness to work around forest fires.  Some positions may require the willingness to work in confined spaces such as tunnels.

 

KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS, AND ABILITIES (KSA)

 

          Basic knowledge of the use, operation and maintenance of various tools and

                   equipment used in the performance of assigned duties.

 

          Skill in the use of various tools and equipment used in the performance of

                   assigned duties.

 

          Ability to perform prolonged, strenuous physical labor.

          Ability to follow oral and written instructions and perform assigned tasks

                   without constant close supervision.

 

          Some positions in this class may require one or more of the following:

 

          Basic knowledge of spoken and written English sufficient to understand

                   instructions.

          Basic knowledge of arithmetic (addition, subtraction, multiplication,

                   and division).

 

          Ability to pass a physical examination.

          Ability to keep accurate detailed records of work accomplished.

          Ability to maintain harmonious working relationships with all levels of

                   agency staff, clients, inmates and the public.

          Ability to use, operate and maintain specialized equipment.

 

          SPECIAL QUALIFICATIONS

 

          Some positions in this class may require the possession of an Oregon driver's license valid for the class of vehicles used by the employing agencies.

 

          NOTE:  The KNOWLEDGE and SKILLS are required for initial consideration.  ABILITIES may be required for initial consideration, at any time during the selection process, or during a trial service period as a final stage of the selection process.  Some duties performed by positions in this class may require different KSA's.  No attempt is made to describe every KSA required for all positions in this class.  Additional KSA requirements will be explained on the recruiting announcement.

 

 

Adopted 1/90

 

 

Revised

 

 

Examples of work are typical of duties assigned to this class.  No attempt is made to describe every duty performed by all positions in this class.

Photocomposition specialist #2460

   

 

GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF CLASS

 

The PHOTOCOMPOSITION SPECIALIST employs experience and special training to correctly encode/format hard or soft copy material to meet photocomposition standards for the further processing and printing of materials by printing plant.

 

 

DISTINGUISHING FEATURES

 

This is a single classification and not currently part of a series of classes.

 

 

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

 

1.       Encoding.  Typical tasks:  reviews work order and hard or soft copy of draft material to determine desired margins, headings, indents, page numbers, type style, and size as well as spacing and positioning of graphic materials; consults with supervisor, author, or editors to clarify directions when necessary; keys in correctly coded material from hard copy or converts soft copy formats to appropriate photocomposition formats at a word processing or computer terminal; provides consultation and advice regarding unusual publication or document formats as they relate to photocomposition standards; obtains advice and direction from Printing Division photocomposition coordinator or typesetting/composition supervisor in higher education printing plant to resolve difficult or unusual coding/formatting problems; may develop agency or unit manuals or guides pertaining to photocomposition standards such as templates for book building programs; provides advice and instruction to other agency staff in modifying existing or creating new word processing programs to meet photocomposition standards.

 

2.       Copy Proofing.  Typical tasks:  proofreads galley (hard copy may be produced through on site printer or from Printing Division) to identify and correct errors in spelling, punctuation, grammar, format, visual appearance and readability; corrections may be made manually on hard copy or through a terminal keyboard on soft copy; returns proofed galley to printing plant for final printing (may be via direct modem connection electronically or by sending hard copy to Printing Division or higher education printing plant).

 

3.       Paste Up.  Typical tasks:  cuts and pastes typeset proofs to create final press ready product, determines margins and enlargement or reduction percentages of photographs and artwork supplied; positions type and artwork to meet specifications; determines imposition and alignment of camera ready copy, lays out and pastes up signatures for several methods of production.

 

4.       Systems Maintenance and Operation.  Typical tasks:  maintains accurate production records on a daily basis; consults and coordinates with agency specialists on new electronic systems and procedures which may affect photocomposition operations; trains employees to understand and use photocomposition coding systems and equipment; maintains contact and coordination with Printing Division or higher education printing plant regarding changes or developments in photocomposition systems or procedures; maintains current of knowledge of process and procedures by attending training when available and may participate in informal user group meetings to exchange information and experience; may monitor computerized photocomposition control panel and CRT screen indicators to know when receipt of in‑house or telecommunicated data is complete; keys in directions to computer to typeset completed copy received, monitors process to catch any errors, corrects errors or contacts system operator to remedy problem; loads magnetic tape into drive unit, makes back up tape of days work.

 

5.       Miscellaneous.  Typical tasks:  depending on agency or unit assignment, may operate on‑site modem and direct transmission equipment tied to the Printing Division or higher education printing plant; may operate local interfaced printer systems to make own galleys or receive galley proofs direct from Printing Division or higher education printing plant; may be responsible for completing printing job orders for agency and to provide liaison with Printing Division or higher education printing plant staff; may operate optical character scanning equipment (key in or recover text and codes for tape production); may perform routine word processing duties as time permits; some positions may work with specialized legal document formats and update and train others in the use of computerized legal resource systems (Oregon Legislative Information System, Westlaw legal research on‑line terminal).

 

 

RELATIONSHIPS WITH OTHERS

 

Employees in this position have frequent daily in‑person or telephone contact with agency staff to provide or obtain information related to materials, processes, or procedures involved in photocomposition activities.  The employee will have regular telephone or in‑person contact with technical staff of the printing division or a higher education printing plant to obtain advice or information about materials being processed or problems with the system operation.  There is occasional telephone or in‑person contact with agency specialists in programs or systems to clarify operations processes and procedures they relate to the photocomposition operation.

 

 

SUPERVISION RECEIVED

 

Employees in this class receive general supervision and work assignments from a unit supervisor or manager.  Once proficient in coding and systems operation the employee will work with a high degree of independence.  Depending on the nature of the assignment work may be reviewed in progress or as completed for accuracy, timeliness, and conformance to agency policy procedure and operational guidelines.  The employee is guided by technical manuals related to equipment and system operations as well as coding and formatting guides and agency policy and procedure manuals.  The employee is further guided through consultation with technical specialists within the agency on programming or processing problems of materials and with technical staff at the printing division or higher education printing plant regarding photocomposition system standards and operations when needed.

 

 

GENERAL INFORMATION

 

Positions are generally found in the production environment of a printing plant.  They require the willingness to work in the environment associated with the position's location including occasionally working for long periods at a desk or work station reading a computer terminal screen and the noise and heat of word processing equipment.

 

 

 

KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS, AND ABILITIES (KSA)

 

          General knowledge of uses, capabilities, and interrelationships of word

                   processing hardware and software.

          Basic knowledge of proper grammar, punctuation, spelling, and

                   capitalization.

          Basic knowledge of typesetting codes and related terminology.

          Basic knowledge of the security systems for computer stored information.

          Basic knowledge of the resources available to resolve difficult problems

                   in photocomposition operations.

          Basic knowledge of standard proofreader marks and symbols.

 

          Skill in using dictionaries, handbooks, and other reference material.

          Skill in formatting correspondence, manuscripts, including those with

                   footnotes, statistical data, charts, outlines, speeches, and reports.

          Skill in working independently away from authors, using own judgment in

                   discerning content errors, priorities, and formats for projects.

          Skill in production typing.

          Skill in proofreading work accurately, correcting errors in initial

                   preparation stages.

          Skill in interpreting and transcribing from dictation media.

          Skill in basic math and measurement conversion (pica pole/proport wheel).

 

          Ability to teach others technical subject matter related to photo

                   composition operations.

          Ability to provide quality work under tight time frames.

          Ability to work effectively for more than one person.

          Ability to maintain harmonious working relationships in a team environment

                   or with individuals.

          Ability to recognize the need for system/format changes and initiate draft

                   changes.

          Ability to monitor use of systems and equipment against security

                   standards, policies and procedures.

          Ability to utilize capabilities of word processing hardware and software

                   to develop program applications, new program designs, and correct program/logic errors.

          Ability to analyze system and equipment problems and repair needs.

          Ability to analyze a variety of operational information to develop and

                   interpret policies, procedures, and guidelines.

          Ability to understand and synthesize user needs in the development of new

                   systems or revision of existing systems.

          Ability to observe and apply State and agency laws, rules, and guides.

          Ability to observe and apply equipment and product manuals, guides, and

                   directions.

          Ability to keep current via training, reading, and attending user groups.

 

          NOTE:         The KNOWLEDGE and SKILLS are required for initial consideration.  ABILITIES may be required for initial consideration, at any time during the selection process, or during a trial service period as a final stage of the selection process.  Some duties performed by positions in this class may require different KSA's.  No attempt is made to describe every KSA required for all positions in this class.  Additional KSA requirements will be explained on the recruiting announcement.

 

 

 

Adopted 1/90

 

 

Revised

 

 

 

 

Examples of work are typical of duties assigned to this class.  No attempt is made to describe every duty performed by all positions in this class.

Printing Press Operator #2441

GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF CLASS

 

The Printing Press Operator sets up, operates and maintains large lithographic printing presses and related equipment used to produce a variety of high-quality single- or multi-color printed materials in a printing plant.

 

DISTINGUISHING FEATURES

This is a single classification with three levels, each characterized by the size of the press used and the product produced.

 

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES  (Generally)

  1. Make Ready.  Reviews work orders/job tickets and arranges work in order of similarity to limit number of press make-ready operations.  Loads ink in ink fountain, standardized paper in feeder, mounts plate to cylinder, adjusts to paper size/thickness and sets proper ink and fountain solution flow.  Runs test copies to assure quality of ink laydown, makes further adjustments in product as necessary.

Specifically:

Level 1—Operates single-color press, maximum of 14 x 20 inches in size.

Level 2—Operates one- or two-color press, maximum of 23 x 29 inches in size.

Level 3—Operates four-color press, or any press with four or more units, including six-color press, maximum of 28 x 40 inches in size.

  1. Press Runs:  Starts press and monitors operation of press to assure consistent quality of printed product and smooth operation of equipment.  Makes minor adjustments to press or ink/water fountain as needed throughout press run.  If product is two-sided, offload completed 1st run, change cylinder plate and reload stock in correct position to print second side.  Routes finished press run of product (Letterheads, Envelopes, Forms, Business Cards, etc.) to bindery for finish work or direct shipment to client.  Reviews next job order and does necessary make-ready for new press run.

Specifically:

                  Level 1—one- to two-color, producing standardized products.

                  Level 2—one- to four-color, producing non-standardized products.

Level 3—multi-color operation of up to six or more colors, producing highly                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       complex products.

3.         Miscellaneous.  Maintains required time and production records for all time worked; recording work performed on job ticket and using proper production codes on daily time record as each job is completed.  Performs preventative and corrective maintenance on all small press equipment used, including minor repairs, notifies unit supervisor of any equipment or other production problems.  Clarifies unclear job orders with supervisor and maintains a clean, safe working environment.  May provide assistance in bindery, shipping areas or other operations as deemed necessary for smooth work flow throughout the printing plant.

 

RELATIONSHIPS WITH OTHERS

Employees at all three levels have regular contact with other units (bindery, prepress, shipping, mail, etc.) to coordinate production flow.  There may be occasional telephone or personal contact with clients to obtain information to clarify orders and will be available to perform press checks with clients to ascertain color builds/quality laid down in one pass through the press.  This position will also be in contact with other agency staff to order supplies and equipment technicians or vendors regarding repairs or new operating procedures for equipment/materials used.

 

SUPERVISION NEEDED

 

Employees in this class, once proficient in the operation of equipment and production procedures, will receive general supervision from a unit supervisor who routes, prioritizes and assigns specific print jobs to be done.  Work is reviewed as complete for timeliness, accuracy, conformance to job specifications, unit quality and production standards.  Guidance is provided by specific production information on job order ticket, unit or plant operating manuals including given standards of quality and timeliness, as well as equipment and maintenance manuals.  Clarification of production problems is normally through the unit supervisor or plant operations manager.

 

 

GENERAL INFORMATION

 
Positions are primarily found in a printing plant. Work is performed within a manufacturing environment containing chemicals, paper dust, odor and high levels of equipment noise; work overtime on relatively short notice.  Employees typically walk, stand and work while bending, stooping and lifting for extended periods, as well as lift and carry heavy boxes, cartons and lifts of paper and/or printing supplies.

 

 

 

 

Revised 11/02

Printing Trade Coordinator #2476

      

 

GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF CLASS

 

The PRINTING TRADES COORDINATOR coordinates and oversees journey‑level bindery workers, bindery assistants, press operators, lithographic platemaker, photocomposition specialists, or manual, semi‑skilled workers in the production of printed materials.  Work is performed indoors in a printing production environment.

 

 

DISTINGUISHING FEATURES

 

This is a single classification and not currently part of a series of classes.

 

 

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

 

1.       Work Coordination.  Typical tasks:  coordinates work with other units to ensure a flexible and even use of personnel through the various production areas; determines overtime requirements to meet delivery deadlines, and ensures an even distribution of overtime; acts as liaison between work unit and Customer Service section of plant to ensure cost effective and timely production of printing orders as well as problem resolution; adjusts work assignments and schedules to maintain adequate staffing levels that respond to fluctuating workloads.

 

2.       Administrative Duties.  Typical tasks:  assists administrative superior in tracking, monitoring, and projecting unit's budget needs; assists superior in developing policy, procedures, and plans for matters such as scheduling and extent of routine equipment preventative maintenance; monitors and accounts for unit's inventory of equipment, tools, and supplies; conducts annual physical inventory; requisitions materials and supplies or purchases on own up to authorized spending limit; monitors equipment maintenance requirements; keeps log on equipment status and maintenance schedules; determines needs for outside contractor and makes recommendation to superior; assists superior in employee selection process; evaluates employee performance and recommends appropriate performance appraisal to supervisor; assesses training needs of staff and assists superior in providing appropriate instruction; assists superior in providing initial orientation to new employees; conducts monthly safety meetings within the work unit and takes appropriate actions on issues raised by personnel.

 

3.       Printing Production Work.  Typical tasks:  performs semi‑skilled or skilled journey‑level work in same trade as is being coordinated (e.g., photocomposition ‑ computer encoding, book building, paste‑up, proofreading; plateroom ‑ stripping, camera work, plate burning; pressroom ‑ offset printing press operation; bindery ‑ folding, cutting, collating, saddle binding, perfect binding, trimming).

 

4.       Miscellaneous.  Typical tasks:  troubleshoots and makes minor repairs to equipment; contact outside repair person for major repairs; disposes of worn and obsolete equipment according to state and agency guidelines; acts as resource for information to agency staff and users in matters relating to unit's jurisdiction or expertise.

 

 

RELATIONSHIPS WITH OTHERS

 

Employees in this class have daily in‑person contact with other division staff to coordinate schedules and minimize disruption of agency services.  They have occasional in‑person contact with division customers involved in various stages of printing projects to coordinate and evaluate project progress.  They have in‑person contact with vendors and suppliers when purchasing equipment and materials, and with repair people when requesting repairs to equipments.

 

 

SUPERVISION RECEIVED

 

Employees in this class receive general supervision from the Plant Superintendent who reviews work through daily informal meetings and by reading daily and monthly production reports analyzing production levels, on‑time delivery, and deadhead ratios.  Work is reviewed for conformance to division and agency policy, procedures and guidelines, and adherence to unit's budget.  Employees in this class exercise independence in action and judgment to complete assigned tasks.

 

 

GENERAL INFORMATION

 

Positions are found in the State printing plant in Salem and may be found at Higher Education printing facilities in Corvallis and Eugene.  They require the willingness to:  work within a manufacturing environment; work in an environment containing chemicals, paper dust, odor, and high levels of equipment noise; work overtime on relatively short notice.  They require the willingness and ability to walk, stand, and work while bending, stooping, and lifting for extended periods, and the willingness to lift and carry heavy boxes, cartons, and lifts of paper and/or printing supplies.

 

KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS, AND ABILITIES (KSA)

 

          Extensive knowledge of setup, operation, maintenance, and repair of

                   equipment and machines in the unit.

          Extensive knowledge of materials and supplies used in trades unit (paper,

                   inks, additives, etc.).

          Extensive knowledge of workflow and procedures in assigned trades unit.

          Extensive knowledge of job planning, scheduling, and coordinating in

                   trades unit.

          General knowledge of functions, workflow, and production requirements of

                   other trades units.

          General knowledge of coordination required between print trades units.

          General knowledge of evaluation of equipment, materials, and supplies

                   used.

          General knowledge of ordering and purchasing procedures for

                   materials and supplies.

          General knowledge of affirmative action and applicable safety procedures.

          General knowledge of training new employees and apprentices in trades

                   unit.

          General knowledge of assigning, coordinating, and prioritizing trades unit

                   jobs.

          General knowledge of production limits of assigned trades unit.

 

          Skill in performing journey level work in trades unit coordinated.

          Skill in overseeing and coordinating trades unit operations.

          Skill in tracking production, equipment maintenance, and supplies.

          Skill in orienting and training new employees and apprentices in trades

                   coordination.

          Skill in evaluating production requirements, including overtime needs.

          Skill in coordinating with other production units and clients.

          Skill in evaluating machinery, equipment maintenance, and repair needs.

          Skill in evaluating cost effectiveness and quality of equipment,

                   materials, and supplies.

          Skill in adjusting workflow to meet unexpected demands.

          Skill in coordinating and cooperating with customer service section and

                   clients.

          Skill in evaluating and providing employee training needs.

          Skill in the operation, maintenance, troubleshooting, and repair of

                   equipment used.

 

          Ability to assign, oversee, and review production tasks.

          Ability to assist management in review and selection of new employees.

          Ability to assist management in evaluation of employees' work.

          Ability to coordinate and lead assigned trades staff.

          Ability to effectively plan and schedule preventive maintenance and

                   repairs.

          Ability to keep operations within budget limits.

          Ability to learn and apply division and agency policies, procedures, and

                   guidelines.

 

          NOTE:         The KNOWLEDGE and SKILLS are required for initial consideration.  ABILITIES may be required for initial consideration, at any time during the selection process, or during a trial service period as a final stage of the selection process.  Some duties performed by positions in this class may require different KSA's.  No attempt is made to describe every KSA required for all positions in this class.  Additional KSA requirements will be explained on the recruiting announcement.

 

 

 

 

Adopted 3/90

 

 

Revised

 

 

 

 

Examples of work are typical of duties assigned to this class.  No attempt is made to describe every duty performed by all positions in this class.

Clone of Position Description Forms

    Position Descriptions

    Direct Appointments to Ongoing or Interim Positions

    The University of Oregon is an equal opportunity employer committed to recruiting and employing well qualified candidates for available employment opportunities.  Consistent with that commitment, it is the university’s practice to conduct competitive searches to enhance the excellence of the institution’s workforce, and to facilitate the attainment of affirmative action goals and objectives.  As appropriate, the university will recruit both within and outside its work force to obtain qualified applicants, with the scope of search national, regional or local, depending on the nature of the position. 

    The university recognizes that there may be situations in which a compelling reason exists to make a direct appointment.  Direct appointments are considered an exception to general guidelines and will be considered under certain circumstances.

    Process for Direct Appointments

    A hiring unit requesting consideration for a direct appointment without a search either of a current university employee or a candidate external to the university, will be asked to provide justification for the appointment through submission of the position description, job requisition, and the appropriate justification form, in MyTrack, the online talent management system.

    Direct appointments are managed by employee group. 

    Officer of Administration Position Description

    Download the OA Position Description Form

    Performance Appraisals

    See links below:

    Classified Performance Evaluation Instructions

    INTRODUCTION:

    It is university policy that all employees receive annual performance appraisals. Article 54 of the SEIU collective bargaining agreement (PDF) and Article 36 of the Teamster agreement (PDF) outline this process for classified employees. The SEIU contract provides for two appraisal forms, one for information technology positions and one for all other classifications. If you have questions about the classified performance appraisal process, please contact Employee and Labor Realtions, 541-346-2966.

    Remember that the performance appraisal process is part of a longer relationship with an employee that includes on-going communication and coaching. There should be no surprises in the performance appraisal.

    1. BEGIN THE APPRAISAL PROCESS

    Schedule an appointment to discuss the performance appraisal with the employee, ensuring adequate time and appropriate space for a meaningful and confidential exchange. You may want to begin the process by sending the "Performance Appraisal Discussion Questionnaire" to the employee to help him or her prepare for the appraisal discussion. This questionnaire serves as a vehicle for discussion and creates a mechanism for the employee to contribute to the appraisal. Completion of the questionnaire is optional for the employee. This form is not a part of the official performance appraisal and is not submitted to Human Resources.

    In addition, include a copy of the employee's position description and ask him or her to make revisions as appropriate. The position description summarizes the duties of the position and the skills, knowledge and abilities required of the employee for satisfactory performance. It also serves as the basis of the performance appraisal. Review the employee's position description yourself and make notes of your suggested changes.

    To prepare for the appraisal, review supervisory files and other documents that indicate achievements and other performance factors during the year. Examples include thank-you letters and commendations or complaints from customers or colleagues. Some classified positions support a number of faculty members or administrators. In this case, it may be appropriate to solicit assessments from these individuals to include in your appraisal of the employee. Once you have gathered information and supporting documents, complete the appraisal form as described in #2 below with your initial evaluative comments. It is usually a good idea to ask your supervisor to review your appraisal plan prior to discussion with the employee.

    2. COMPLETE THE PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL FORM

    Duties Section:
    Use the position description to complete the duties section of the "Classified Employee Performance Appraisal" form. List each duty, its percentage of the job, and whether it is an essential function. Carefully consider the performance descriptions for each duty and mark the box that best describes the performance of the employee for that duty. As appropriate, expand on your assessment with a narrative comment that provides examples or highlights strengths and weaknesses. Narrative comments are required when a rating of "Unsatisfactory Performance" is given. Furnish comments that clarify for the employee what performance the employee must do to improve from a rating of "competent" to "highly competent"). Copy the back side of page if you are evaluating more than four job duties.

    Behavioral Factors Section:
    Carefully consider the descriptions for each behavioral factor listed and mark the box that best reflects the work behavior of the employee. While recommended for all behavioral factors, narrative comments are required when you indicate on the form that the work behavior is unacceptable. Using narrative comments, clarify for the employee what improvements are required to advance through the criteria (i.e., provide specific behavior changes the employee must make to receive a higher rating on work behavior).

    Employee Development Section:
    List the training, workshops, and courses taken during the covered period and indicate how training benefited performance. Human Resources training records may be attached. Specify future training needs (if any) and the plan for how the training will be accomplished. Keep in mind that employee development may take various forms to meet professional, technical or job-specific goals regarding duties or behavioral factors.

    3. MEET WITH THE EMPLOYEE

    Begin the performance appraisal discussion with a review of the position description. Discuss possible revisions to the description with the employee and draft the final version.

    If your employee has completed the "Performance Appraisal Discussion Questionnaire," review his or her responses to the questions. Listen carefully to the employee's contributions, ask questions, and respond thoughtfully.

    Discuss in depth the appraisal form you completed, spending time on each duty or behavioral factor. Give examples to illustrate your ratings. Offer the employee the chance to provide input and ask questions. It is essential that the employee leave the meeting with a clear understanding of how he or she is meeting performance expectations and how to improve.

    4. FINALIZE THE APPRAISAL

    After the performance appraisal meeting, incorporate any revisions to the performance appraisal form that came about as a result of your discussion and prepare a final copy of an updated position description. Schedule another meeting with the employee so that both of you can sign the appraisal and position description. At this time, the employee completes the "Employee Response" section and indicates whether you as supervisor discussed the appraisal with him or her. The employee may attach a written response to the appraisal. He or she may also send a response to Human Resources within 60 days which will be placed with the appraisal in their personnel file.

    The performance appraisal form has a space for "Reviewer" signature. Generally, this is the supervisor's supervisor or the department head. Give copies of the performance appraisal and position description to the employee and keep a set for your supervisory files. The originals should be sent to Human Resources. (If there are no changes to the position description you do not need to send this document to Human Resources.) The Human Resources Director's signature is added as "Appointing Authority". The performance appraisal is placed in the employee's personnel file and the position description is filed by position number.

    Classified Performance Evaluation Discussion Questionnaire

    Supervisors may wish to use a questionnaire to initiate discussion of work performance with an employee. The following is a sample:

    To:
    From:
    Date:
    RE: Discussion Questionnaire, Classified Performance Appraisal


    We will be meeting to discuss your performance over the past year and to set goals for the next year. Your input is an important part of this meeting. In order to make an accurate evaluation and appropriate plans, I need some information from you. If you choose to complete this questionnaire, please return it to me by ______________.

    Please note: Completion of this form is optional and will be used as a discussion tool only. It is not/will not become a part of your formal, written performance appraisal that will be submitted to Human Resources.


    • Do you have any questions about your job responsibilities, as outlined in your position description?
    • What do you consider your greatest accomplishment(s) over the past year?
    • What training, education or other learning experiences have you had in the past year?
    • What additional training, education or resources do you need to improve your job?
    • If you could make changes in your job or the department, what would they be?
    • Do you have any other concerns you would like to discuss at this meeting?

    Classified Pay Increases

    ANNUAL MERIT STEP INCREASES:  Classified employees receive annual merit step increases on their salary eligibility date until reaching the top of the pay range.  In all cases, step increases are based on merit. 

    NEW HIRE:  For new employees who are not currently employed by OUS or an OUS institution, the starting pay is generally the first step in the range.   In some cases, a higher step may be required in order to attract a qualified candidate.  A starting rate of pay above first step requires written approval from the Senior Recruiter.  Employees who are new to OUS will be eligible for a step increase the first of the month following one year of employment, and annually from that date until they reach the top of the range. 

    PROMOTION:  A promotion for classified employee occurs when an employee is selected for a position in a higher salary range as the result of a search.  The employee receives a one-step increase upon promotion.  If a one-step increase is below the first step of the new range, he or she will be paid at the first step.   

    TRANSFER/DEMOTION:  Classified employees who transfer or demote (i.e., move to a position in the same salary range or lower) receive no increase at the point of transfer or demotion but are eligible for a step increase at the regular increase date, until the top of the range is reached.  An employee who demotes may not be paid more than the top step in the new range. 

    SPECIAL MERIT INCREASE:  Classified employees may receive special merit increases as outlines below. These increases are granted in addition to the annual merit step increase, described above.  A special merit increase does not affect the regular annual increase:  it is an additional step increase granted either at the time of the regular increase (i.e., a two-step hike) or at different time of the year.  Employees at the top of their pay range are not eligible for special merit increases.  It is used to recognize and reward exceptionally outstanding performance or address a significant equity issue for meritorious employees.  Because these increases are intended for exceptional cases, it is expected that only a few will be submitted from each vice presidential area each year. 

    A letter or memo of justification from the dean, department or unit head must be submitted to the Human Resources Analyst that clearly outlines the extraordinary circumstances warranting the request and provides examples of exceptional performance, a recently completed employee evaluation and updated position description. If salary equity is a reason, relevant salary information must be included.  After review, the request will be forwarded to the appropriate vice president for approval. 

    Questions?  Contact Diana Sobczynski, Human Resources Analyst, at 6-6296.

    Revised Classifications and Selective Salary Adjustments

    A reminder that effective November 1, 2015, per Article 21, Section 3 of the SEIU Collective Bargaining Agreement, the following positions shall be placed in the new salary range in the following manner:

    Classification Class # Current Range New Range
    Campus Dispatcher 0312 14 15
    Co-Gen Engineer 4251 24 25
    Early Childhood Assistant 2316 10 12
    Early Childhood Associate Teacher 2315 15 17
    Elevator Mechanic 4475 28 33
    Mid-Level Med. Pract. 6258 33 35
    Paralegal 1 1523 15 18
    Paralegal 2 1524 19 22
    Paralegal 3 1525 22 25

    If you have any questions, please contact Human Resources.

    Student Employment Link

    Waiver of Search Process Form