Records & Data Management

It is the employer’s responsibility to maintain accurate employee records. Both state and federal law apply to the maintenance of employment histories which include, but are not limited to employment related actions such as recruitment and selection, promotion, classification, compensation, performance, discipline, and training. Accuracy of employment data and dates maintained in these records determine an employee’s eligibility for university programs and services, Oregon University System (OUS) opportunities, as well as both the Public Employee Benefit Board (PEBB) and the Public Employee Retirement System (PERS). The official personnel record for all classified employees is located in Human Resources. This file is maintained under conditions which ensure the integrity and safe keeping of the file. Upon reasonable notice an employee may inspect their official personnel file. Ref: SEIU Article 16 – Personnel Records.

Classified Employee Records and Data

Human Resources takes great care to manage employee records properly.  It is important to understand which records are considerd public and which are kept private as well as who may obtain access to employee records.

Confidentiality

Public Records

Certain information regarding employment status is considered a public record for employees working at the University of Oregon. University departments may disclose the following information as a matter of public record:

  • employee name
  • employee date of hire
  • employee work phone
  • position(s) held
  • salary rate(s)
  • termination date, if applicable

Disclosure of other information outside the University, including an employee's representative, requires a written authorization from the employee.

Confidential Records

Certain information may not be released to representatives of outside entities.  This information includes:

  • Social Security Number
  • home address and home and personal cell phone number

However, this information may be released to OUS and UO staff members if needed to conduct their duties.

Access to Records

The following parties may inspect a classified employee's file:

  • the employee
  • the employee's supervisor or potential supervisor
  • an employee's official representative with the employee's signed authorization
  • a bargaining unit representative
  • Human Resources and other UO staff, as appropriate
  • a representative of the Employment Relations Board with a subpoena or signed authorization with the approval of the general counsel's office
  • a law enforcement agency that presents a written authorization signed by the classified employee
  • government agencies conducting official investigations with approval of the general counsel’s office

An investigatory office from the Bureau of Labor and Industry, Civil Rights Division, Department of Justice, or Equal Employment Opportunity Commission may inspect a record that is pertinent to an official investigation.

Personnel File Contents

The personnel file shall contain the following mandatory documents which  are retained for a given number of years according to the collective bargaining agreement and legal records retention schedule:

  • employment application - first UO job
  • employment application - current job
  • Personnel Information Form & Payroll Request form(s)
  • performance appraisals
  • summary of training completed
  • letters of commendation/recommendation
  • notices of disciplinary action
  • notices of layoff
  • documentation of resignation
  • Personnel Records Disclosure Form

Note:

  • Medical or psychological records are not retained in the official personnel file but are in a confidential file, physically separate per the Americans with Disabilities Act and the Family and Medical Leave Act.
  • No information reflecting critically on an employee shall be placed in the employee's personnel file without notification to the employee. 
  • The employee shall be entitled to prepare a written explanation or rebuttal regarding critical information believed to be incorrect or a misrepresentation of the facts. This documentation shall be included as part of the employee's personnel file until such time as the critical material is removed.
  • In addition to hard copies in the employee's personnel file, electronic records are also maintained in a number of data bases including the payroll data base

 

Confidential Records Recycling

Employee Identity Protection

Events and trends over the past few years have heightened awareness of problems arising from identity theft and related misuse of personal information. Commonplace availability of key personal information such as Social Security Number (SSN) and the absence of strong measures for protecting privacy have contributed to identity theft with disastrous ramifications for the victims. To help protect our faculty and staff, the university issues a unique numeric identifier to each employee that is used to conduct university business.

The unique identifier is a nine (9) digit number beginning with 95, and we call it the UO ID.

More detailed information about the UO ID is available at http://bg.uoregon.edu/node/959

If you have questions please contact Kerry Davis at (541) 346-2959.

UO ID Request Form

To establish a University of Oregon ID number, please submit to the Payroll Office the EIF with the top two sections filled out. The EIF can be found on the banner guide linked below.

Employee Information Form

 
Employee Information Form
Please return this form to your hiring department by fax or U.S. Mail.
 
 
Section 1. To be completed by employee
 
Employee Name (As listed on Social Security Card.) Last
First
Middle
Preferred First Name
SSN UO ID # Date of Birth
Gender: Male Female
(if known)
Oregon Retirement Plans: I am/or was a member of PERS ORP
Race/Ethnicity (completion of this section is optional) 1. Are you Hispanic or Latino? Yes No 2. Select one or more of the following races:
Asian
American Indian or Native Alaskan Black or African American
Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander White
3. Racial or ethnic subgroup:
Citizenship
Country of Residence:
U.S. Citizen
U.S. Resident Alien
Foreign National (Non-Resident Alien)
Mailing Address
Street
City State
Zip Nation Home Phone
Employee Signature Date:
 
 
Section 2. To be completed by department (After completion of Section 1 and 2, send to Payroll Office)
 
Employee Class New Hire Rehire
Monthly Appt % Start Date
If applicable:
Employee is transferring from
Employee will be employed part-time at (OUS institution)
OUS Institution / State Agency
Campus Address / Phone Numbers
Rm No. Bldg
Zip Plus 4
Campus Phone
Check box if Proximity card required for bldg access?
 
Department Name and Check Delivery
Department Name Department Org Earnings Statement Org
Direct Deposit (complete paper form or enroll via DuckWeb) with Paperless Earnings Statement Option
Pick-up check at Payroll Office
(if other than hiring dept)
Authorization
Payroll Administrator’s Name (Printed) Phone Number Date Signed
Payroll Administrator’s Signature
Email Address
 
 

University Identity Management

University of Oregon Archives - Records Retention

University of Oregon Profile - Resource Management Statistics

Banner (HRIS)

Position Description Forms

See the links below for Position Description forms

Officer of Administration Position Description

Description: 

Performance Appraisals

Classified Peformance Evaluation Discussion Questionnaire

Supervisors may wish to use a questionnaire to initiate discussion of work performance with an employee. The following is a sample:

To:
From:
Date:
RE: Discussion Questionnaire, Classified Performance Appraisal


We will be meeting to discuss your performance over the past year and to set goals for the next year. Your input is an important part of this meeting. In order to make an accurate evaluation and appropriate plans, I need some information from you. If you choose to complete this questionnaire, please return it to me by ______________.

Please note: Completion of this form is optional and will be used as a discussion tool only. It is not/will not become a part of your formal, written performance appraisal that will be submitted to Human Resources.


• Do you have any questions about your job responsibilities, as outlined in your position description?
• What do you consider your greatest accomplishment(s) over the past year?
• What training, education or other learning experiences have you had in the past year?
• What additional training, education or resources do you need to improve your job?
• If you could make changes in your job or the department, what would they be?
• Do you have any other concerns you would like to discuss at this meeting?

IT Performance Appraisal Instructions

Description: 

Page 1 of 12
Oregon University System
COMPLETING A PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL
For Employees in Classified Information Technology Positions
Represented by the Oregon Public Employees Union
Instructions for Supervisors
INTRODUCTION
The variable pay program for information technology employees is designed to
support and promote organizational effectiveness through improved performance
at the individual and group level, and reward employees for their contributions.
Performance appraisal is a process, not just a piece of paper. This appraisal
system focuses on the future, as well as the past. It provides a way for
assessing achievements, building relationships, and incorporates the principles
and strategies that encourage success.
Following is a list of detailed instructions for the appraisal process. Further
assistance is available from your Human Resources Department.
SECTION ONE: EMPLOYEE INFORMATION
EMPLOYEE NAME: First name and last name of the employee whose
performance is being evaluated.
IDENTIFICATION NUMBER: The employee’s identification number that is used
for payroll purposes.
DEPARTMENT: The department where the employee is assigned.
CLASSIFICATION TITLE: The classification title for the employee’s position.
CLASSIFICATION NUMBER: The classification number.
COMPETENCY LEVEL: Indicate whether the employee is classified as Competency
Level 1, 2, or 3.
Page 2 of 12
POSITION NUMBER: The position number of the employee’s job.
EVALUATION PERIOD: The beginning and ending dates for the period covered
by the evaluation.
SALARY ELIGIBILITY DATE: The date the employee is eligible for a merit
increase.
SALARY: Check whether the employee’s salary is “at or below” the control point
of the salary range, or “above” the control point.
RATING: Check whether the evaluation is for completion of trial service, annual
review, or documentation for a special merit increase.
SECTION TWO: COMPETENCIES
COMPETENCIES: The following categories represent the knowledge, skills, and
abilities of information technology workers that are known to be critical to
business success:
· Technical Knowledge
· Work Coordination
· Problem Solving/Prevention
· Communication & Service
· Accountability
Competencies provide a road map so employees understand the knowledge,
skills, and abilities it takes to do their jobs well and advance their careers. They
communicate the mission and values of the organization. In addition,
competencies allow supervisors and employees to place emphasis not only on
what gets accomplished, but how it gets accomplished. Focusing on the kind of
behavior, style, and approach that supervisors desire is as important as the
results.
PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: Performance standards describe the behaviors,
specific skills, knowledge, or techniques (within the general competency
category) that an employee needs to apply to achieve the desired job objectives.
Performance standards form the framework by which performance will be
evaluated.
Performance standards can either be specific skills and/or behaviors from each
area of competence (See “Defining Competencies for Information Technology
Classifications”), or other appropriate standard. Select standards that are
Page 3 of 12
relevant to the employee’s work assignments. Establish what the employee is
expected to achieve during the review period-—both ongoing and specific skills
and competencies.
At the beginning of the performance appraisal period, the supervisor and the
employee should discuss the competencies and performance standards upon
which the employee will be evaluated. If the employee has input in developing
the standard, the supervisor can expect fewer disagreements or disappointments
later.
RATING: At the end of the performance evaluation period, the supervisor shall
consider the employee’s performance and select the rating level that most
accurately describes how well the employee typically performed in each area of
responsibility. The supervisor may request input from the employee.
RATING LEVELS:
Outstanding: Regularly makes exceptional contributions which have a
materially positive impact on the department or organization. Has
mastered all job-related skills and possesses a broad range of capabilities.
Provides a model for excellence.

Consistently Exceeds Standards: Consistently exceeds all performance
expectations/objectives. Highly skilled in relation to technical
requirements of the job. Regularly produces expected accomplishments in
all areas of responsibility. Meets difficult challenges. Demonstrates sound
judgment and decision-making abilities.
Meets Standards: Consistently meets all job standards and may
occasionally exceed performance expectations or objectives.
Demonstrates effective performance and is fully qualified to perform job
duties with the appropriate amount of direction. Consistently performs in
a reliable and professional manner.
Does Not Fully Meet Standards: Has not consistently met job
requirements, and may occasionally demonstrate unsatisfactory
performance. Has not successfully performed tasks of the job in all areas
of major responsibility. May have the ability to complete most
assignments, however, immediate improvement and further development
must be demonstrated. If this level of performance continues, an
Improvement Plan may be required.
Page 4 of 12
Performance on each standard should be examined and evaluated separately.
Do not attempt to determine an overall rating across all standards at this time.
COMMENTS: The supervisor may record any remarks or explanation of the
employee’s performance or rating. This commentary will enable the employee to
understand why the performance was rated as it was.
SECTION THREE: PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES
OBJECTIVES: Performance objectives are the heart of the merit pay program.
This section records reasonable outcomes or projects for the employee to
accomplish during the upcoming appraisal period. There is no restriction on the
number of objectives that the supervisor and the employee develop for the next
evaluation period. Identify as many as you need, but make sure the workload is
realistic.
Good performance objectives meet the following SMART criteria:
S = Specific
State clearly what is to be accomplished in concrete terms that can be
easily observed and mutually understood.
M = Measurable
Objectives should be quantifiable, stating exactly what the criteria for
success is, how that success will be tracked and measured, and whether
the measurement tools are available.
A = Attainable
Can the result be realistically achieved? (Is the process used workable
and within the employee’s control? Are the needed resources available?
Is the time frame reasonable? Is the objective a “reachable” stretch?)
R = Realistic
Based upon the employee’s knowledge of the job, the objective should be
linked vertically to the organization’s goals, as well as being difficult, yet
feasible.
T = Time Bound
Each objective should have a clearly defined time frame.
Studies have shown that good planning gets good results. Following are several
alternative methods to develop performance objectives:
· The supervisor and employee together may develop the objectives; or
Page 5 of 12
· The supervisor and employee may develop the objectives separately, then
meet and make modifications; or,
· The supervisor develops the objectives and reviews them with the employee.
Allow for flexibility when writing performance objectives. They will need to be
adjusted when work priorities change. (Sample objectives and performance
standards are offered on page 6.)
Although writing objectives will take time, if it is done jointly, it can be a
worthwhile step toward improving job performance. There is little chance that
an employee who is involved in a joint process will be in the dark about where
the employee stands, or that the employee will forget he/she is a principal
participant in his/her own development and is responsible for it.
The supervisor should monitor projects and assignments on a continual basis.
This allows the supervisor to identify unacceptable performance when it occurs
and provide assistance to address such performance rather than waiting until the
annual review.
The supervisor should meet with the employee and review objectives at least
once during the evaluation period, and preferably quarterly, to discuss
performance-to-date. This interim review should include a discussion about
whether the stated work assignments or priorities have changed or should
change. If so, the supervisor should record those changes and provide a copy to
the employee.
PERFORMANCE STANDARD: For each objective that you have listed, indicate
the target results, either as a quantity or quality. Indicate the manner in which
the end result will be achieved in a satisfactory (meets standards) manner.
Standards are:
· Relevant to objectives
· Clearly defined and documented
· Appropriate considering existing realities
· Challenging but attainable
· Understood by and acceptable to constituencies
· Revised as appropriate
WEIGHT: The supervisor indicates the relative of importance of the objective—
critical, major, or secondary. Following is a general guideline for defining
priorities.
Page 6 of 12
Critical: Must be met or exceeded in order for the unit to meet its
objectives. (Planned objectives should include no more than two or three
objectives that are critical in nature.)
Major: Must be met or exceeded in order for an individual to be effective.
Secondary: Should be met, but will not preclude the individual/unit
effectiveness.
SAMPLE OBJECTIVES AND PERFORMANCE STANDARDS:
EXAMPLE #1
Objective: (Critical) Coordinate the technical aspects of the Alpha project
and ensure the project is complete by February 1, within the $600,000
budget, and that the resulting system meets customer specifications.
Performance Standard: “Meets Standards” performance will consist of: 1)
completion by deadline, 2) costs at budget, 3) system performance meets
customer requirements, and 4) customers sign off that they understand
user procedures and are able to operate the system.
EXAMPLE #2
Objective: (Major) Within the next six months, the employee will define
customer requirements for an Alpha System, develop a proposed system
solution to meet requirements and obtain customer approval for mock-up,
including input and output formats, computational processes, and quality
assurance procedures.
Performance Standard: Customer evaluation of project produces ratings of
Fully Satisfactory or better on 1) responsiveness to customer needs, 2)
timeliness, 3) quality of work, 4) efficiency/cost control, 5) technical
performance of system.
RESULTS: Throughout the evaluation period you may find it useful to keep a
record of significant events or accomplishments on the Performance Tracking
Record available at:
www.ous.edu/hr/compensation/Performance_Tracking_Record.htm
At the end of the appraisal period, the supervisor (or, supervisor and employee)
documents the outcome of the employee’s efforts to achieve the objective. The
supervisor may rely on factual information, as well as observation. If an
employee feels the supervisor’s data is incorrect, it is the employee’s
responsibility to produce corrected information.
Page 7 of 12
The focus is on performance—on actions relative to goals—not the personality
traits of the employee. The supervisor should recognize positive, negative, and
incomplete results.
RATING: At the end of the performance evaluation period, the supervisor
considers the employee’s performance and selects the rating level that most
accurately describes how well he/she accomplished that objective. Written
performance evaluation is required prior to awarding a performance based salary
increase.
Performance on each objective should be examined and evaluated separately.
Do not attempt to determine an overall rating across all objectives at this time.
COMMENTS: The supervisor may use this space to record any remarks or
explanation that supports the achievement level indicated. This commentary will
enable the employee to understand why the performance was rated as it was.
This section should include a description of any extraneous factors or
unanticipated events that complicated or inhibited the employee’s ability to
achieve the desired result(s). In addition, if revisions are made to original
objectives and standards, state the reason and the adjustment here.
DISCUSSION OF HOW WORK WAS PERFORMED: If how the employee
performed the job had an impact on the work of peers, users, or the
effectiveness of the unit, specify what behaviors, skills, knowledge, and
techniques were involved and how they affected the effectiveness of the
employee.
UNPLANNED ACCOMPLISHMENTS: List other accomplishments achieved by
the employee that were not included in the original list of planned objectives.
SECTION FOUR: SUMMARY
SUMMARY RATING: The supervisor must consider all aspects of the
employee’s performance, including the relative importance of each of the
objectives, and select the rating level that most accurately describes the overall
performance during the evaluation period.
The focus is on job performance—not the personality traits of the employee.
Develop a rating based on how well the employee performed in relation to the
Page 8 of 12
competencies and performance objectives, the relative weight given to each
objective, and any other relevant accomplishments.
If the employee receives less than a satisfactory evaluation, the supervisor
should meet with the employee within thirty (30) days of the evaluation to
review, in detail, the alleged deficiencies.1
If an employee is rated “Does Not Fully Meet Standards” and the supervisor
recommends withholding the performance increase, the supervisor must give
notification in writing, including the reasons for withholding the increase, at least
fifteen (15) days prior to the employee’s eligibility date.2 .
When new employees are progressing satisfactorily through their initial
appointment to a new or promotional position, but may not yet have had the
opportunity to demonstrate all of their skills, we would not normally use the
“Does Not Fully Meet Standards” category, as this would unduly penalize them
for a natural and appropriate learning curve.
COMMON RATER ERRORS
Halo Effect: The tendency to rate a person who is exceptionally strong in
one area high in all other areas. One factor has undue influence on the
other ratings.
Horns Effect: This is the opposite of the Halo Effect—a tendency to rate
a person who is especially weak in one factor low on all other factors.
Central Tendency: Tendency to avoid both high and low extremes,
lumping all ratings in the middle category.
Leniency: This occurs when the rater gives all high ratings or a
disproportionate amount of high ratings.
Severity: The opposite of Leniency—a tendency to give all low ratings or
a disproportionate number of low ratings.
1 Reference Article 57, Section 2, of the OUS/OPEU Collective Bargaining Agreement
2 Article 57, Section 4.
Page 9 of 12
Similar-to-Me: Some raters have a tendency to give persons who are
similar to them higher ratings on the basis of biographical backgrounds,
attitudes, etc.
Contrast Effect: The tendency of raters to evaluate persons relative to
each other, rather than on the basis of individual performance evaluation
criteria.
COMMENTARY SUPPORTING SUMMARY RATING: This section provides an
opportunity to emphasize, expand, or clarify the overall rating.
This commentary will enable the employee to understand why the performance
was rated as it was.
DEVELOPMENTAL NEEDS/PLANS: Providing employees with training and
development opportunities encourage good performance. Training strengthens
job-related skills and helps employees keep up with changes in technology.
The supervisor and employee should reach agreement on needed development,
resources needed to enable the employee to perform at the desired level, and
steps to improve performance. Supervisors may wish to help employees find
ways of satisfying their own professional interests and meeting the objectives of
the organization at the same time.
SECTION FIVE: SIGNATURES
RATING PERFORMED BY: Signature of the supervisor who performed the
review.
RATING REVIEWED BY: The supervisor has the option of having the
performance appraisal reviewed by another supervisory person. Supervisors in
academic or general business departments should feel comfortable asking a
technical supervisor in a central Information Technology office to review the
planned objectives, performance standards, or results.
Employees who receive an evaluation of “Meets Standards” or higher may
request an independent review by a representative from the university/college
Human Resources Department.3
3 Article 69, Section 3, E.
Page 10 of 12
EMPLOYEE SIGNATURE: The signature of the employee does not signify
agreement with the review, but only that he/she has read the evaluation.4
EMPLOYEE COMMENTS: This section provides an opportunity for the
employee to record remarks about any aspect of the performance appraisal. All
written comments provided by the employee within sixty (60) days of the
evaluation shall be attached to the performance evaluation.5
APPOINTING AUTHORITY: Signature of the designated appointing authority
for the institution.
Once completed, the performance evaluation will be placed in the employee’s
personnel file.
SECTION SIX: COMMUNICATING WITH THE EMPLOYEE
DURING THE EVALUATION PERIOD:
· A fundamental component of successful evaluation is regular communication
between the supervisor and the employee. Building work relationships is
essential to achieving desired results. Regular two-way communication
between the employee and supervisor helps build this relationship.
· Brief discussions should take place whenever appropriate. Formal sessions
should be scheduled at least once during the evaluation period, and
preferably quarterly, to discuss what is going well and what can be improved.
· Use these sessions to describe rather than evaluate performance. Inquire
about any changes in the work situation since the previous discussion.
Determine if there are any obstacles blocking success. Ask about resources
that the employee may need to accomplish their objectives. Acknowledge
accomplishments during this period. Discuss new priorities in the department
so the employee can re-focus efforts, if appropriate. Modify plans in
response to changes.
· It is important for both parties (supervisor and employee) to maintain open
communication in order to keep each other informed of work progress and
work together to resolve problems when they occur. It is far better to
resolve problems when they are small, before they become “disasters.”
4 Article 57, Section 2.
5 Article 57, Section 2.
Page 11 of 12
· A key principle that encourages employees to accept constructive criticism is
to be “hard on the problem, and soft on the person.” The focus should be on
correcting the problem or behavior, not on punishing the employee. The
performance evaluation is an assessment of performance and should not be
punitive. The performance evaluation should not be the place where the
employee first hears about disciplinary action.
· A useful motto for the performance appraisal should be “no surprises.”
Through this approach, you can reduce the likelihood of the employee
becoming emotional during the review.
· Strive to provide continual feedback concerning expectations and
performance. When things are going well discuss how and why this is so.
When things are not going well discuss what needs to be done to make them
right. When an employee is not doing things properly, get together and plan
what needs to be done to correct the matter. If there is a performance gap,
help the employee understand the cause and the action necessary for
correction. Support plans for professional development.
· By providing feedback on a continual and timely basis throughout the
evaluation period, the supervisor establishes the groundwork for indicating
that there is a performance problem.
ANNUAL REVIEW:
· Schedule a meeting with the employee. (Although a self-assessment is not
required, including it may provide the employee with a greater sense of
participation in the process.) During the meeting, review the evaluation and
facilitate an open exchange of information concerning expectations and
results. Resolve any disagreements on factual matters. Determine the
reasons for different views relative to subjective assessments and resolve
them if at all possible. Be open and make every effort to respond in a
positive manner.
· The annual review is a good time for the supervisor to review the position
description with the employee and determine if the work described is current,
or if the job duties have changed. The position description may need to be
revised and a copy sent the Office of Human Resources.
· Analyze the issues and attempt to view them from both sides. Listen
carefully to the employee and try to understand their perspective. Give the
same attention you would expect from your own supervisor.
Page 12 of 12
· In conjunction with the evaluation, it is important to discuss the impact of the
appraisal on salary. The parties should establish performance expectations
for the upcoming review period, allow the employee to comment on the form,
and have the employee sign to verify that it has been reviewed with them.
· The appraisal is complete when the supervisor has determined—through
paraphrasing and feedback, as well as nonverbal communication—that the
content and issues have been successfully communicated, that concerns from
both parties have been expressed, and that the employee understands and
agrees to their “contract” for the upcoming period.
Note: If these procedures are found to conflict with the Collective Bargaining
Agreement, the Collective Bargaining Agreement shall take precedence.

File Type (ext): 
pdf

Defining Competencies for Information Technology Classifications

File attachments: 
Description: 

DEFINING COMPETENCIES
FOR
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY CLASSIFICATIONS
The new classifications for Information Technology workers reflect today’s business needs and the changing
environment of work. We are moving away from discrete, narrowly focused "jobs" and into an environment where
the complexities of work require broader skills and flexibility. Work assignments may even change on a daily basis.
In order to respond to this cultural change, the new job classifications encompass a broad array of duties and
responsibilities. We use competence factors to distinguish among the various levels of work within the new
classifications.
Competencies represent the knowledge and skills required for performing and supporting the business processes.
They represent the basis for creating value in an organization. Competence factors are observable and measurable.
The following competencies are critical to achieving organizational and individual success in the field of information
technology.
Technical Knowledge encompasses those skills and abilities within a specialty area(s) of Information Technology
required to deliver products and services that support business processes.
Work Coordination encompasses those skills and abilities required to organize and prioritize work, respond to
conflicting business needs, and work collaboratively with a group of people to produce a product or service.
Problem Solving and Prevention encompasses those skills and abilities required to analyze issues within a specialty
area(s) and evaluate alternatives to achieve quality and technical solutions that support the long and shortterm
goals
of the users and departments, and the mission of the university.
Communication and Service encompasses those skills and abilities required to effectively exchange information in
order to interpret the needs of our customers, respond to their needs, achieve user satisfaction, and teach varying
levels of information technology tools to groups or individuals.
Accountability encompasses those skills and abilities required to make decisions and take responsibility for work.
COMPETENCY LEVELS
Level 1 is designed for those who apply general knowledge to address common problems of a limited scope and/or
contribute to group tasks. Typically works under direct supervision.
Level 2 includes those positions requiring proficiency to work somewhat independently. They apply broad
knowledge to standard and nonstandard
technical applications to solve a wide range of problems and accomplish
tasks. This is a journey level position.
Level 3 requires more indepth
and comprehensive knowledge in their field(s). They work independently and may
consistently resolve the most complex work assignments or problems. They may use advanced communication and
leadership skills to coordinate and plan projects. They are distinguished from Level 2 by the broadest possible scope
of work and impact of their decisions.
The tables below provide examples of typical skills and behaviors that characterize three levels of competence. Users
of the system should view the levels as additive. That is, level two is also expected to demonstrate the skill set profile
of level one; level three is also expected to have the skill sets of levels one and two.
Areas of
Competence
Level 1 Level 2 Level 3
Technical
Knowledge
encompasses those
skills and abilities
within a specialty
area(s) of
Information
Technology required
to deliver products
and services that
support business
processes
a. Uses general
knowledge of
technology and
standard principles
within work specialty
area(s) to work on a
limited number of
platforms or systems
b. Competent with
standard tools
c. Supports and operates
technology at a basic
level
a. Uses broad knowledge of
technology, including
areas beyond basic
technology
b. Is likely to work on
multiple
platforms/networks
c. Serves as a technical
resource
d. Familiar with appropriate
technology standards and
rules
a. Uses indepth/
comprehensive
knowledge of specialty
area(s) to assume
responsibility for a large
complex system
b. Uses knowledge of new
technology to estimate
and advise concerning
the impact of for new
services
c. May serve as system
architect
Areas of
Competence
Level 1 Level 2 Level 3
Work
Coordination
encompasses those
skills and abilities
required to organize
and prioritize work ,
respond to
conflicting business
needs, and work
collaboratively with
a group of people to
produce a product
or service
a. Tasks are typically
assigned by a
supervisor and/or
follow standard work
procedures
b. May prioritize own
work
c. Performs routine or
scheduled
maintenance
d. Contributes as a teama.
Organizes and executes
multiple projects/tasks
b. Reprioritizes
when new
issues arise, to ensure a
timely response
c. Organizes work flow
processes to achieve
efficiency
d. Coordinates with others
on shared projects
e. May fulfill different roles
a. Initiates and/or manages
coordinates major or
complex projects
b. Designs systems to work
together integration
strategies and methods
c. Engineers work processes
d. Develops maintenance
plans for specialty area(s)
e. Gives direction to team
members
player to accomplish
work applications
within a team
f. May participate in
multiple teams
f. Leads multiple team
efforts
g. Trains team members in
specialty area(s)
Areas of
Competence
Level 1 Level 2 Level 3
Problem
Solving and
Prevention
encompasses those
skills and abilities
required to analyze
issues within a
specialty area(s),
evaluate alternatives
to achieve quality
and technical
solutions that
support the long and
shortterm
needs of
users and
departments and the
mission of the
university
a. Recognizes, tracks,
and reports problems
b. Performs basic
diagnostic work
c. Resolves problems
that are narrow in
scope or related to
simple, routine
occurrences
d. Resolves problems by
explaining how to use
product
e. Resolves problems
with guidance and
direction
f. Knows where/when
to request technical
assistance
a. Evaluates products new
to
campus/department/unit
b. Assesses performance
issues of current systems
or products
c. Assesses user
requirements and
determines best match
with technology options
d. Diagnoses complex
problems
e. Resolves nonroutine
problems that affect an
entire work unit or
department
f. Serves as a resource to
others
g. Demonstrates strong
analytical skill
h. Works effectively under
pressure
i. Finds solutions within
limited resources
j. Serves as project leader
for crises of moderate
proportion
k. Finds, obtains, and uses
resources to solve
a. Analyzes performance
issues at a campus or
department or other large
scale
b. Assesses business needs,
conducts feasibility
studies and develops
formal costbenefit
analysis for new
acquisitions
c. Responsible for
developing proactive
approaches
d. Anticipates problems
e. Resolves the most
difficult problems or
those that affect the entire
campus system
f. Serves as a resource for
problems affecting
multiple systems/large
scale projects
g. Serves as project leader
for for system crises of
significant proportions
h. Introduces new/creative
solutions
i. Understands the bigger
picture and identifies
problems
l. Works independently and
is selfdirected
crossfunctional
integration and system
impacts
Areas of
Competence
Level 1 Level 2 Level 3
Communication
& Service
encompasses those skills
and abilities required to
effectively exchange
information in order to
interpret the needs of our
customers, respond to
their needs, achieve user
satisfaction, and teach
varying levels of
information technology
to groups or individuals
a. Communicates
(predominantly) with
individual customers
and/or within own
work unit
b. Asks questions or
requests more
information to
further
understanding
c. Routine interactions
with vendors,
outside agencies
d. Demonstrates
patience and respect
with user
e. Establishes effective
working relationship
with user
f. Follows up to make
sure that customer
expectations have
been met
g. Writes
documentation of
programs
h. Provides basic
instruction to
individuals users or
a. Communicates more
broadly across
disciplines and outside
of work unit
b. Defuse difficult or
complex situations
c. Coordinates problems
and solutions with
vendors, outside
agencies
d. Assesses users skill
level and communicates
appropriately to users
level of understanding
e. Translates technical
information to nontechnical
people
f. Writes reports and
documentation
g. Interprets user needs;
guides customer to
become selfreliant
h. Conducts formal
training sessions for
small or large groups of
users or IT staff
i. Develops and/or adapts
standard material for
training
a. Communicates regularly
technical issues with
administrators, outside
agencies and across
departments and
organizations
b. Functions as a
consultant to
administrators
c. Makes formal
presentations to large
groups
d. Represents
department/business unit
in external meetings
e. Anticipates customer
needs and develops
technical services to
meet their needs
f. Establishes standard for
customer service or
system reliability
g. Analyzes customer
satisfaction
h. Formulates strategies to
increase customer
satisfaction
i. Designs training
curriculum for new
services
small groups j. Conducts advanced
training for industry
recognized certification
for users or IT staff
Areas of
Competence
Level 1 Level 2 Level 3
Accountability
encompasses those
skills and abilities
required to make
decisions and take
responsibility for work
a. Makes decisions
within established
guidelines
b. Decisions affect a
limited area
c. Exercises personal
"ownership" in using
resources in the most
efficient manner
d. Makes decisions
regarding what needs
to be done by
recognizing the
existence of, and
difference among, a
few easily
recognizable
situations
a. Makes decisions within
broad parameters
b. Understands costs and
benefits associated with
various options for work
processes
c. Decides what tools to
use
d. Resourceful, works with
limited resources
e. Makes decisions
regarding what needs to
be done by assessing
unusual circumstances,
variations in approach,
and incomplete or
conflicting data
f. Selects from many
alternatives to choose a
course of action
a. Recommends guidelines
for technical resource
allocations
b. Reconciles competing
demands between
conflicting interests
c. Makes decisions
concerning such things
as the interpreting of
considerable data,
planning of the work, or
refining the methods and
techniques to be used
after extensive probing
and analysis
d. Typical end of technical
problem escalation chain
e. Accountable for
resolution of systemwide
outages
f. Responsible for data
integrity

Classified Performance Appraisal Form (non-IT)

Description: 

Classified Performance Appraisal Form (IT)

Description: 

Oregon University System

PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL
For Employees in Classified Information Technology Positions
Represented by the Oregon Public Employees Union


 
SECTION ONE: EMPLOYEE INFORMATION

EMPLOYEE NAME: (First and last)
EMPLOYEE IDENTIFICATION NUMBER:
DEPARTMENT:
CLASSIFICATION TITLE:
CLASSIFICATION NUMBER:
COMPETENCY LEVEL: (Check one) Level One ___  Level Two ___  Level Three ___
POSITION NUMBER:
EVALUATION PERIOD: Beginning Date:                  Ending Date:
SALARY ELIGIBILITY DATE (enter date):
SALARY: (Check one) At or Below Control Point ___ Above Control Point ___
RATING:  (Check one) Trial Service ___ Annual ___  Special Merit ___

SECTION TWO: COMPETENCIES

TECHNICAL KNOWLEDGE

Performance Standard (enter information):

Rating:  (Check one)
Consistently Exceeds Standards ___ Meets Standards ___
Does Not Fully Meet Standards ___

Comments (enter information):

WORK COORDINATION

Performance Standard (enter information):

Rating:  (Check One)
Consistently Exceeds Standards ___ Meets Standards ___
Does Not Fully Meet Standards ___

Comments (enter information):


PROBLEM SOLVING/PREVENTION

Performance Standard (enter information):

Rating:  (Check One)
Consistently Exceeds Standards ___ Meets Standards ___
Does Not Fully Meet Standards ___

Comments (enter information):


COMMUNICATION & SERVICE

Performance Standard (enter information):

Rating:  (Check One)
Consistently Exceeds Standards ___ Meets Standards ___
Does Not Fully Meet Standards ___

Comments (enter information):


ACCOUNTABILITY

Performance Standard (enter information):

Rating:  (Check One)
Consistently Exceeds Standards ___ Meets Standards ___
Does Not Fully Meet Standards ___

Comments (enter information):
SECTION THREE: PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES

OBJECTIVE #1 (enter information):

Performance Standard (enter information):

Weight:  (Check One)  Critical ___ Major ___  Secondary ___
 
Results (enter information):

Rating: (Check One)
Consistently Exceeds Standards ___ Meets Standards ___
Does Not Fully Meet Standards ___

Comments (enter information):


OBJECTIVE #2 (enter information):

Performance Standard (enter information):

Weight:  (Check One)  Critical ___ Major ___  Secondary ___
Results (enter information):

Rating: (Check One)
Consistently Exceeds Standards ___ Meets Standards ___
Does Not Fully Meet Standards ___

Comments (enter information):


OBJECTIVE #3 (enter information):

Performance Standard (enter information):

Weight:  (Check One)  Critical ___ Major ___  Secondary ___

Results (enter information):

Rating: (Check One)
Consistently Exceeds Standards ___ Meets Standards ___
Does Not Fully Meet Standards ___

Comments (enter information):


OBJECTIVE #4 (enter information):

Performance Standard (enter information):

Weight:  (Check One)  Critical ___ Major ___  Secondary ___

Results (enter information):

Rating: (Check One)
Consistently Exceeds Standards ___ Meets Standards ___
Does Not Fully Meet Standards ___

COMMENTS (enter information):

OBJECTIVE #5 (enter information):

Performance Standard (enter information):

Weight:  (Check One)  Critical ___ Major ___  Secondary ___
 
Results (enter information):

Rating: (Check One)
Consistently Exceeds Standards ___ Meets Standards ___
Does Not Fully Meet Standards ___

Comments (enter information):


DISCUSSION OF HOW WORK WAS PERFORMED (enter information):

UNPLANNED ACCOMPLISHMENTS (enter information):


SECTION FOUR: SUMMARY

SUMMARY RATING: (Check one)

Consistently Exceeds Standards ___ Meets Standards ___
Does Not Fully Meet Standards ___

    Recommended percentage of increase         

COMMENTARY SUPPORTING SUMMARY RATING (enter information):


DEVELOPMENTAL NEEDS/PLANS (enter information):

Is training required?  If so, specify:

Additional resources needed to increase effectiveness (enter information):


SECTION FIVE: SIGNATURES

RATING PERFORMED BY (enter name):

Print Supervisor’s Name                         
Supervisor’s Signature ____________________________________  Date ___________

RATING REVIEWED BY (enter name - Optional):

Print Name                         
Signature ______________________________________________  Date ___________

REVIEWER’S COMMENTS (enter comments):

Employee’s signature is required only to indicate that the employee has read the performance appraisal.

Employee Signature ______________________________________  Date ___________

EMPLOYEE COMMENTS (enter comments):

APPOINTING AUTHORITY (enter name):

Signature ______________________________________________ Date ____________

DuckWeb for Employees

DuckWeb for Employees is a joint implementation effort of Business Affairs, Information Services, and Human Resources to provides a web-enabled service for employees. Employees may login to DuckWeb to review, and in some cases update, personal and employee information. For example, employees may update their home address, phone number and elect the paperless option and view their earning statement on-line. They may view W-4, W-2, benefits, earnings, and leave balance information. Implementation of DuckWeb's, Web for Employee lays the groundwork for eventual Web enabled Benefits Open Enrollment and other processes.

DuckWeb FAQs

 

What is DuckWeb for Employees?

DuckWeb for Employees allows employees to look at their benefit and payroll data stored in the Banner Human Resources Information System (HRIS).

I have forgotten my PAC; what should I do?

Upon logging into Duckweb you may indicate that you have forgotten your PAC by clicking on the button "Forgotten PAC?" You will be asked to enter your birthdate (MMDDYY.) If you have a security question, you will be asked to answer it. When you answer correctly the system will allow you to reset your PAC. If you do not have a security question you will need to have your PAC reset.

  • For Faculty, Officers of Administration, Classified and Temporary Staff contact the Office of Human Resources at 541-346-3159.
  • For Students, including applicant for admission, contact or visit the Office of the Registrar, 2nd Floor, Oregon Hall 541-346-2935.

I am a new employee; how do I get my PAC?

New unclassified employees will be sent a PAC letter along with their initial contract from Human Resources. New classified employees will be sent a PAC letter via campus mail as soon as their affiliation with the campus is established in the payroll database. If employee is not new to campus, see instructions above.

What kind of information can I find in DuckWeb?

You may elect the paperless option and view your earnings statement on-line. You may look at or do the following:

  • Change PAC
  • Update Address(es) and Phone(s)
  • Change Security Question
  • View Email Address
  • View UO computing account information
  • Earning Statement
  • Direct Deposit
  • Deduction History
  • Tax Information
  • Benefits
  • Leave Balances
  • Job Record Changes
  • QuikPAY® UO Bill

If you are or were also a student, you can look at your student records. If you are a faculty member or a GTF, you will also have access to your class lists, teaching schedule, and grade rosters.

How do I get into DuckWeb for Employees?

To login to DuckWeb for Employees, there are four things you need: the website address, your UO ID number, your personal access code (PAC) and a security question.

Website Address: https://duckweb.uoregon.edu or go to UO home page and click on DuckWeb.

ID number: your UO ID number (or your social security number until you have a UO ID number)

Personal Access Code: This code is sent confidentially to each employee.

Security Question: The security question is set up by you upon initial login to DuckWeb. You must think of a question for which you and you alone know the answer. In order for the security question to help protect your sensitive information, the question must not have a yes or no answer.

Why do I have to create a security question?

A. In case you ever forget your PAC, you may authenticate yourself to DuckWeb by correctly answering your own security question.

Can anyone else access my personal data through the employee web?

A. No. Only you will know your identification number and PAC, information necessary to access DuckWeb. You may also change your PAC and/or your security question any time.

How do I change my PAC?

A. You have two methods for changing your PAC.

First, you may click on the "Forgotten PAC?" button on the login screen. You will be asked to enter your birthdate (MMDDYY.) If you have a security question, you will be asked to answer it. When you answer correctly you can reset your PAC. If you do not have a security question you will need to have you PAC reset.

  • For Faculty, Officers of Administration, Classified and Temporary Staff contact the Office of Human Resources at 541-346-3159.
  • For Students, including applicant for admission, contact or visit the Office of the Registrar, 2nd Floor, Oregon Hall 541-346-2935.

Second, once you are in DuckWeb for Employees, click on Personal Information, then click on change Personal Access Code (PAC) and follow the instructions.

How do I move around within DuckWeb?

A. The program works best if you use the buttons or links at the top or bottom of the screen of Duck Web. You will find the program does not work if you repeatedly use the back button in your browser.

I clicked on a link and my screen went white, nothing is happening.

A. Click on the "Reload" button at the top of your web browser.

After logging on to DuckWeb, I left my computer and did something else for a while. Now I have been logged off of DuckWeb. What happened and what should I do?

A. After 25 minutes of inactivity or 25 minutes of looking at an unsecured site, the system will automatically log you off. This prevents other people from looking at your personal information if you forget to close DuckWeb and are away from your desk.

I'm a long time employee, why does the "begin date" on my current job say, 01-AUG-1998 and the "date available to be used" on my leave balances form show 01-JUL-1998?

A. Disregard these dates if you're a long time employee. These dates are relics of the Banner implementation and data conversion process during the summer of 1998.

Why is the number on the Pay Stub different from my bank account number?

A. The number you see is a Banner System generated number that the Payroll Office would use to reprint a check or earnings statement.

Does the total employer contribution (listed under net amount) on the pay stub include all employer contributions?

A. No, the total represents employer expenses such as Mass Transit Tax, Workers Compensation, and Social Security and Medicare taxes. It does not include employer contributions or subsidies.

Why do the employer medical and dental contributions show as negative numbers?

A. Employer contributions, shown as negative deductions, are added to employee earnings. Positive deductions are subtracted from employee earnings.

Why isn't cash back showing?

A. In the payroll calculation, cashback is added to net pay and not shown as a separate amount. Your regular printed earnings statement has been programmed to add a subtotal in order to provide this information to you. We plan to enhance the web paystub soon with similar programming.

To compute cashback, subtract insurances (medical, dental, basic life, pre-tax life, and administration fees) from employer contributions and subsidies.

Where do I find my year-to-date deduction amounts?

A. The pay stub on the web does not list year to date amounts. However, under the payroll menu you can select Deduction History and enter the full year date range.

What should I do if I think some of the information shown is incorrect?

A . The accuracy of the information you see in DuckWeb is reliant upon accurate data entry into the Banner database. Several campus offices share the responsibility for data entry. When you find erroneous information, please call the telephone number indicated on the screen.

How do I obtain access to Web for Faculty?

A. Web for Faculty is automatically available to you if you are a faculty member or GTF. You may view or download your class lists, view your teaching schedule and access your grade rosters at the end of the term in order to submit grades. Additional access is granted to faculty members who need access to student records for advising purposes. Complete the Access request form available on the Registrar's website.

Do I use the same DuckWeb Personal Access Code (PAC) for Web for Student, Web for Faculty and Web for Employee?

A. Yes. There is only one DuckWeb PAC. Access to each of the three DuckWeb services is determined as follows:

  • Current and past students can access Web for Student.
  • Current Faculty, Staff and Student employees can access Web for Employee.
  • Faculty and GTF's can access Web for Faculty for certain menu items related to the courses they are teaching. Faculty that submit an Access Request form can access additional student record information as approved by the Registrar.

I have further questions not answered in this FAQ.

Please contact Judy Gates at (541) 346-2952 with any additional questions you may have.

FAQs

Frequently Asked Questions for Records & Data Management